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personal language evolution looseness predictor

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Have you ever said a word over and over again only to discover that repetition destabilizes your ability to pronounce the word correctly?

PLELP is a software application that predicts how many times you can speak aloud a particular word before you are unable to pronounce it correctly.

You enter a word and the software spits back an estimate of how many repetitions you will get too before you are unable to pronounce correctly.

I suppose the equation could be based on how many syllables and letters are in each word.

Ultimately here is a software application that supplies a legitimate reason to repeat the same word over and over again in public.

vfrackis, Jun 29 2010

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       [+] and the add-on that predicts how many times you can say the word before it starts sounding foreign or nonsensical to you. (what, that only happens to me ?)
FlyingToaster, Jun 29 2010
  

       Yes, it only happens to you.
8th of 7, Jun 29 2010
  

       PLELP-PLELP-PLELP -PLELP-PLELP-PLELP...easy one - probably due to the fact that the start and ending mouth-shapes required are the same. I guess what would make something more tricky would be either very, or subtly different mouth-shapes at beginning and end of a given repeated word.   

       “Whelk” becomes quite hard work after about 5 or six repetitions, while “tot” is much simpler - despite both being single syllable words.   

       This would suggest that it’s more a matter of the physical manipulations required by the mouth than being a strictly a syllablactic metric (although the two are likely to correlate over a large enough sample)
zen_tom, Jun 30 2010
  

       <deep> It is in the repetition of the word where it loses its meaning. </deep>
Cedar Park, Jul 03 2010
  

       <joining in the deepness> Unless you're meditating.....<ohmmmmm>
zen_tom, Jul 03 2010
  

       eys cied ses vi ce s':= a command corection regrest polici devise of say, a PNAL BOMB, squd,, :_)
sirau, Jun 12 2011
  

       [s] can you wipe your ass somewhere else please ? thankyou.
FlyingToaster, Jun 13 2011
  

       I wonder, then, if you could train the neurons to somehow be less susceptible to fatigue?   

       Maybe visualising the same object in different ways...   

       On another point, does anyone remember NESSAGUIN?
Ling, Jun 13 2011
  

       "that human vocabulary is very localised in the human brain in that it can be saturated or depleted."   

       zowie another possible thing to study at monozygotic twins to see if the genetics of minimal phrase depletion are genes of better than usual cognition or possibly singing ability
beanangel, Jun 13 2011
  

       I chose a word at random from the idea. I started to stutter after repeating "ultimately" only 23 times. This is a very interesting phenomenon and I think it should be studied.
Voice, Feb 23 2014
  
      
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