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A.I. Turns Car Into Disneyland Style Guided / Contrained Car

Destination put into program constrains car's speed and trajectory.
 
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As a way to reduce accidents, a simi autopilot that allows the driver control of the vehicle's speed and direction but constrains it for safety similar to cars you drive at amusement parks that travel along a rail that keeps the car from going off the path.

This could be switched off when somebody just wants to drive around, but I think most car trips are a planned point a to point b thing so if this worked most accidents could be avoided.

Somebody has to have already thought of this no?

doctorremulac3, Sep 14 2021

Lane Keeping Assist System (LKAS)... https://www.hondain...Assist-System-LKAS/
... applies mild steering torque if it determines the vehicle is drifting toward the side of the lane. [a1, Sep 14 2021]

Safety of Tesla autopoilot and assisted driving systems https://electrek.co...n-average-car-data/
10x safer than letting people drive? [a1, Sep 15 2021]

If an A.I. gets a valid profit return game. https://en.wikipedi...Cars_That_Ate_Paris
The veggies can even be wetware system backup. [wjt, Sep 25 2021]

[link]






       // Somebody has to have already thought of this //   

       Kinda? Sounds like Honda's "Lane Keeping Assist System" (link) - similar to your idea of making the car act like it's on rails while still allowing the driver to actually drive the car. It's part of a broader driver assist package. I just posted Honda's because I had read about it recently, but other car markers offer similar features.
a1, Sep 14 2021
  

       Wherever it comes from, a former frontman for a heavy metal band or an international multi billion dollar car manufacturer, I do think something along these lines is the wave of the future.
doctorremulac3, Sep 14 2021
  

       [In a galaxy outside your door, post-Covid...] Take your 'lane-assist' -equipped family car on a road trip to the amusement park, where Bill* photographs your licence plate, and the car seamlessly shifts over to the park's lane-assist line, providing you've sufficient credit.   

       You'll be traveling through the park in the comfort** of your own car, waiting in lines at the drive-through snacks kiosks, queuing for rides designed to accept any standard road-worthy wheel base. Tired? Tip the chair back and rest, while everyone else** continues to enjoy the ride(s), snacks, dioramas, montages and whatnot.   

       Making cars into trains reminds me of when we used to ride horses onto the train. Saved a lot of horsepower <snurk> on long trips. (Later that same century, we hitched with a canoe to catch the Polar Bear Express to Moosonee in James Bay.)   

       *the Billing Dept. camera, tastefully hidden in plain sight in the frieze between the cornice and the architrave on the park's Welcome arch.   

       **Choose wisely your passengers, Cap'n. Note: At the ZumbaFlume, you will be reminded to roll up your windows. Or not.
Sgt Teacup, Sep 14 2021
  

       [Sgt Teacup]; hitch-hiking with a canoe? That's awesome.
Also, anyone who stopped to pick you & your canoe up, is also awesome.
neutrinos_shadow, Sep 14 2021
  

       [neutrinos], believe it or don't, but back in the day, trains would stop wherever people who needed a lift gathered by the rails at a natural flat, slow spot on the route. There was always a baggage car, and the supply cars; failing that, you could put the canoe in the aisle between the seats. So yes, actual human train crews were awesome.   

       Also awesome were Voyageur bus drivers who'd pick up outside of regular depots, as long as you were waiting along the route at a well-lit spot where drivers could see far enough ahead to come to a safe stop. You could bring your canoe or your bike on the Voyageur bus.
Sgt Teacup, Sep 14 2021
  

       I think self-driving cars would work really well if all cars were self-driving cars, and the only things on the road were self-driving cars
hippo, Sep 15 2021
  

       [hippo] I think what you're describing there are commonly referred to as "trains".
zen_tom, Sep 15 2021
  

       [hippo]; yeah, autonomous vehicles work incredibly well if there is nothing else around. There have been various AGVs in factories & warehouses for a long time. But as soon as you add pedestrians, animals, other vehicles (driven by humans), bikes, weather, etc, it becomes infinitely more difficult.
neutrinos_shadow, Sep 15 2021
  

       "Infinitely" more difficult? How do they compare to human drivers, as a group? Accidents and fatalities per mile driven, for example?   

       Edit to add - found the answer to my own question (link):   

       “In the 1st quarter, (Tesla) registered one accident for every 4.19 million miles driven in which drivers had Autopilot engaged. For those driving without Autopilot but with our active safety features, we registered one accident for every 2.05 million miles driven. For those driving without Autopilot and without our active safety features, we registered one accident for every 978 thousand miles driven. By comparison, NHTSA’s most recent data shows that in the United States there is an automobile crash every 484,000 miles.”
a1, Sep 15 2021
  

       That's always been the number to look at, total accidents of humans vs total accidents of A.I. That being said, anecdotal stories will still need to be dealth with since they have the edge and get the headlines. "The nun was taking 4 orphans to meet Santa at the mall when the autopilot drove them off a cliff." counteracts a lot of boring stories featuring math about accidents being reduced by driver assistance technology.
doctorremulac3, Sep 15 2021
  

       Exactly, doc. The best anecdote I read recently was about a Tesla that veered off the road, into a tree, burst into flames. Two deceased - one in the passenger seat and the other in the back seat. Oh, the horror!   

       Kinda makes you wonder how well a NON- autonomous vehicle holds the road when the driver nods off at the wheel, or decides to climb into the backseat for a nap while the car was still moving.
a1, Sep 15 2021
  

       OK, "infinitely" was a bit much hyperbole...
Of course, most human drivers are very good if there's nothing else around, too.
neutrinos_shadow, Sep 15 2021
  

       [zen] hmmm, yes
hippo, Sep 16 2021
  

       That's the deal a1, 38,000 non-autonomous car crashes won't get the headlines like the guy who fell asleep in the back seat of a Tesla and crashed. That happens twice the news would be "The scourge of A.I. crashes. In other news, regular car crash deaths down to 38,000 this year." Although the news editors would probably have the last part cut out.
doctorremulac3, Sep 16 2021
  

       So [doc], your advocating a central server trip plotter or transponder? a virtual vehicle connection rail. Makes sense, the autonomous car would then only have to identify and model non signalling motion in the changing environment.
wjt, Sep 21 2021
  

       Yea, I'm thinking we're moving in that direction anyway. The auto-driver thing without some kind of prepped road is asking an awful lot of the technology, but with any kind of high tech prep of the road the car needs to drive on, you not only have the enhanced safety thing, but you can smooth the flow of traffic minimizing traffic jams, increase speed safely etc.   

       I think we get a little lost in new technology sometimes. All electric cars suck compared to hybrids in my opinion for instance. A.I. without road enhancements also is jumping too deep into a new technology just so we can say it's new.   

       But of course, we'd have to see what the backup plan is when the system breaks down which it would. Alarms go off and the person is told the backup A.I. is working independently and needs wetware backup so wake up and drive maybe.
doctorremulac3, Sep 21 2021
  

       //wetware backup so wake up and drive//
Unless (as will certainly become the case...) the car is an "auto-taxi" & the passenger can't (or at least, isn't licensed to) drive.
Back-up plan will be "park & call for assistance".
neutrinos_shadow, Sep 21 2021
  

       ^Early learning training, next to dialing for emergency, will be how to pull over and stop a vehicle.   

       ..and how to pull a fuse.
wjt, Sep 25 2021
  
      
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