Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Additional typographical symbols

Improving compression
 
(+1, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Some typographical symbols represent contractions of longer words. "@" replaces "at", "&" replaces "and".

Many small words could be replaced by "letter in circle" glyphs without degrading meaning, like single letter compressions in text messages, while removing ambiguity.

Some, like A, C and R have been used.

A possible scheme might resemble :

Circle-b = "but"
Circle-f = "for"
Circle-h = "he"
Circle-i = "in"
Circle-m = "me"
Circle-n = "now"
Circle-o = "out"
Circle-s = "she"
Circle-t = "the"
Circle-v = "very"
Circle-w = "we"
Circle-y = "you"

This is not a call-for-list.

That is all.

8th of 7, Dec 08 2015

Unicode Combining Diacritical Marks for Symbols 20D0 to 20FF https://www.unicode...harts/PDF/U20D0.pdf
Not sure which fonts support these, but they exist in principle. [zen_tom, May 28 2019]

[link]






       I think the pharmacists have oodles of these 1 letter abbreviations. Keeps it mysterious.
bungston, Dec 08 2015
  

       The trouble with the circle is that it itself already takes up a lot of area and being circular, fails to occupy the corners efficiently. The Chinese have long oppressed their circles into squares, to more efficiently remove individuality and promote plagiarism and low quality exports. Perhaps the first step should be to step back a bit and enforce the squaring of the circle used in such ©®@℗ characters.
Ian Tindale, Dec 09 2015
  

       You want "fanboys" symbols.   

       We want better writers.   

       Stalemate ;)
reensure, Dec 15 2015
  

       " We want better writers. "   

       +
normzone, Dec 15 2015
  

       Why bother with the circle ? none of the examples listed are already used.
FlyingToaster, Dec 15 2015
  

       Unicode is already full, so you're better off using existing symbols. Also, this kind of violates the baseline phonetic principle of English, in that pronunciation of these words would need to be memorized. Not a big deal for me and you, but it would make it that much harder for children and other learners. Chinese is notoriously difficult to learn in large part due to the detachment of pronunciation from character, and this idea is basically the Sinofication of English.
the porpoise, Dec 15 2015
  

       The Unicode "Basic Multilingual Plane" is full, the supplementary planes are not.
Spacecoyote, Dec 15 2015
  

       There are a number of mutating unicode symbols "combining characters" that are used to decorate a standard character with, say an accent, umlaut or according to unicode, in range 20D0 to 20FF, various symbols - an encirculation decoration appears to be represented by code number 20DD, and with some nice symmetry, there exists crossed-through encirculation (like the prohibitive circle-cross around the ghost in ghost- busters) exists at point 20E0. See link.
zen_tom, May 28 2019
  

       FUNEX?
S, VFX.
NFUNEM?
VFN 10 EM.
OIC, UFN 10 EM. OL.
MaxwellBuchanan, May 28 2019
  

       FU NE 4 kd hand Ls?
zen_tom, May 28 2019
  

       That PDF loads straight to the second page (which is where the actual content starts) in my Chrome. Weird. Never seen it do that before.
notexactly, May 28 2019
  
      
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