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Aeroplane Wheel Turbines

Extend life of aeroplane tyres by making them spin before landing.
  (+8, -7)
(+8, -7)
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When a plane touches down on the runway it's tyres are worn down because they suddenly have to go from not spinning at all, to spinning at 100mph, so rubber is burned off. If turbines were attached to the sides of the wheels (or moulded in the sides of the tyres) then when the landing gear was lowered the wind rushing past the tyres would make them spin before they touched the tarmac, so the friction would be lessened, less rubber would be burned off, and the life of the tyres extended.
Jim, Jul 08 2000

Baked in the late 40's early 50's http://www.sensorsm.../0300/14/main.shtml
The special tire made the planes difficult to turn. [IVnick8or, Oct 12 2002]

[link]






       Wouldn't that degrade the work of film/TV dubbing editors who surely love adding the tyre-screech to the puff of smoke in those 'plane-landing' clips from stock footage? Those guys are so keen, I've heard them dub tyre screeches over cars in a grassy field?!?
CaptainTangent, Jul 10 2000
  

       Hmm... surely the idea of the wheels on planes is to help the plane to stop. I would rather have tyres that get worn out every now and then, because they have to apply friction to the ground (!), than the plane I'm sitting in going off the end of the runway.   

       No, for me, worn out tyres is a small price to pay for a safe landing.
Jon, Jul 10 2000
  

       sorry-this system is in use by all major airlines already. a little boy invented this at a schools invention contest in germany-as far as i know he even got payed.this ones fullbaken
lixlpixel, Jul 11 2000
  

       It's in use by all major airlines? Which system do they use (a little motor, windvanes in the tire, what)?
egnor, Jul 11 2000
  

       exactly how jim describes it-the airlines save millions on tires that way-i mean-the idea is great-but lat
lixlpixel, Jul 12 2000
  

       Sea planes are a problem at takeoff... lots of friction...
egnor, Aug 26 2000
  

       If tires are tyres then are wires wyres or are they yres or will the lack of punctuation raise ire or yre?
thumbwax, Sep 30 2000
  

       Then there's the Flintstone system. No wheels. No tyres. Coming in to land the flaps drop down under the passengers. "Ready. Steady. Start running," comes the order.
rayfo, Oct 20 2000
  
      
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