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Anti-European Literature

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Each word of this book - fiction or non-fiction - is written with an ulterior motive. Yes, written by a Euro-hating polyglot, this book is deliberately designed to use as many common English words as have similar-sounding or shared-root words in one of as many as 27 European languages. A celebration of the inclusive and mongrel nature of the English language yes but, each of these euro-linked words are chosen because their euro-language pairs have meanings at odds with the common English use, so any loose-bordered European bureaucrat reading this book in English will have a bugger of a time picking their way through the mantraps and garden paths laid out for them.
calum, Jul 22 2016

Non Credere https://www.youtube...watch?v=1gAPF0FL3SU
[calum, Jul 22 2016]

Some French ones http://www.myenglis...esson-faux-amis.php
to get you started. [pertinax, Jul 24 2016]


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Annotation:







       Can we have an example paragraph?
xenzag, Jul 22 2016
  

       This has the potential to upset and offend a huge number of people*, and would be nothing more than a bigoted xenophobic rant.   

       Doubleplusgood [+]   

       *Most of these so-called "people" would actually be nothing more than bloody foreigners, so don't actually count.
8th of 7, Jul 22 2016
  

       //Can we have an example paragraph?//
Not from me, I don't speak forrin, eh.
  

       The idea, though, sprang from my listening to (Róisín Murphy's version of) the song Non Credere, which contains the two word phrase "solo momento" meaning (presumably) "one moment" which might be the meaning that an Italian reader would ascribe to "solo moment" in some Anti-European Literature where it would instead and of course mean "a short time spent alone".
calum, Jul 22 2016
  

       The format could be a bit limiting, mind - the Italians have no word for "bravery", the french have no word for (or indeed concept of) " honour", and the Germans lack a phrase for "We will not invade Poland" ...   

       <later>   

       Also, the Greeks appear totally unable to comprehend "You have used your available credit - GAME OVER".
8th of 7, Jul 22 2016
  

       The phrase you are looking for (invented by someone French) is "faux ami".
pertinax, Jul 24 2016
  

       WIFRT, I thought it would be an American idea, to take revenge for the anti-American tone of much European literature of the mid-C20th.
pertinax, Jul 24 2016
  

       Just read the first couple of pages of "Prague Cemetary" very creative abuse...example   

       "I have known ****s, and even worked for them: the lowest conceivable level of humanity. A ***** produces on average twice the feces of a Frenchman. Hyperactivity of the bowel at the expense of the brain, which demonstrates their physiological inferiority. During times of barbarian invasion, the ****** hordes strewed their route with great masses of fecal material. In recent centuries, ____ travelers knew immediately when they had crossed the **** frontier by the abnormal size of the poop left lying along the roads. "   

       And so on..
not_morrison_rm, Jul 24 2016
  

       There's no need to redact it. This is the hb - can't take a joke, shouldn't have joined.   

       // Frenchman //   

       Sp. "frenchman" or indeed "the lowest conceivable level of humanity"
8th of 7, Jul 24 2016
  

       //can't take a joke//   

       A French colleague, er, guy that I know can do a surprisingly accurate impersonation of an English guy doing an impersonation of a French accent...
Ling, Jul 24 2016
  

       You mean one's escaped ? Call the cops ...
8th of 7, Jul 24 2016
  

       No way. Where I am, all foreigners are called 'Farang': there are several theories for this, the most worrying being that it is a bastardisation of 'Farancey' which is again a bad transliteration/pronounciation of a certain country.   

       It effectively means that all Farang are tarred with the same birds in a bush.
Ling, Jul 24 2016
  

       // tarred with the same birds in a bush. //   

       No, you're not doing it right. First apply the hot tar, then the feathers.   

       J.
8th of 7, Jul 24 2016
  

       "ifrangi" in Arabic (there is "khwahgar" as well) is foreigner (or Frank/French person), so I've been ifrangi and farang..sighs...now at least I'm just gaijin, change is as good as a rest etc..
not_morrison_rm, Jul 24 2016
  

       For the price of a plane* ticket, you could add "gwailo" to your repertoire of appelations.   

       *"No.1 Big Metal Bird b'long White Man go up in sky, big ju-ju".
8th of 7, Jul 24 2016
  


 

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