Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Bucket of Steam

Yes, in the literal sense.
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Basically the same as a kettle, except in bucket-shape, with a lid. You put in a small amount of water (let's say a cup or two), you boil it (to save taking power from the bucket), tip it into the bucket, seal it up, and let it boil, then steam past 100 C. The bucket would have an in-built battery (for portability) that would be recharged (while completely empty) from a wall socket, but it would be a bit heavy (thus a small amount of water would only be used). Handle included. Available in various colours.

Froglet Limited will not accept any liabilities for any injury caused by looking into the bucket as it opens, or breathing in the said steam.

froglet, Jul 19 2005

Just use a clothes steamer http://www.thebuzze...d=112160&refid=1015
...much more convenient. [DrCurry, Jul 19 2005]

[link]






       I hate to bother you with small details, but why?
Worldgineer, Jul 19 2005
  

       Why indeed - see link.
DrCurry, Jul 19 2005
  

       Why not?   

       I'd just use it for opening envelopes.
froglet, Jul 19 2005
  

       Add clams. Remove after 5 minutes. Serve with melted butter.
Shz, Jul 19 2005
  

       Do you nkow how big that battery would need to be in order to produce a bucket of steam from water? Massive. Unless you were only trying to make the bucket's volume in steam from a few teaspoons of water. In which case, you might get by with a few 9 volt cells.
estreet, Jul 19 2005
  

       Or for steaming vegetables.
froglet, Jul 19 2005
  

       Might I recommend two buckets of steam?
daseva, Jul 19 2005
  

       [estreet] The bucket wouldn't hold much water - most of it would be dedicated to batteries to keep it staying as steam, so it *would* be heavy. Which leads to the question: Why on earth would you want to cart around some steam in the first place (unless you're proving a point)?
froglet, Jul 19 2005
  

       In a low-power version, you could add a tablespoon of water, then pump out all the air, lowering the pressure, and allowing the water to boil at a much lower temperature.   

       You may possibly be able to power it with a smart rub between your hands, or on a suitably woolly sweater.   

       If it had a window in the side, you might even be able to watch it rain as the temperature cools enough for the water to return to wet form.
zen_tom, Jul 19 2005
  

       //you might even be able to watch it rain as the temperature cools enough for the water to return to wet form//   

       Now that would be cool - I guess it could be used in geography to show about rain and stuff...
froglet, Jul 19 2005
  

       Perhaps the main part of the apparatus could be replaced with a small card (perhaps 10cm x 6cm) with the word "steam" written on it?
Basepair, Jul 19 2005
  

       Next, a bucket of condensed fog...er...no, I misread the name. I guess it'll have to be a bucket of frogs, then.
ldischler, Jul 20 2005
  

       [froglet], I could sell you some concentrated steam, if you are interested. Just add heat.
Ling, Jul 20 2005
  

       And the bucket could be replaced with a brown envelope with "Bucket" written on it. If it were a window envelope then you would be able to see the "Steam" card inside!
Minimal, Jul 20 2005
  

       insert hot water.
remove pressure.
no battery necessary.
have a bun, warm and moist.
ato_de, Jul 20 2005
  

       // Why on earth would you want to cart around some steam in the first place (unless you're proving a point)?   

       Perhaps this could just be a tribute to the great engineers of the past who built the steam engine.
PauloSargaco, Oct 25 2007
  
      
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