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Care labels on the outside

Attracts mates by saying "I know how to do my own laundry"
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I have a shirt that is very comfortable, except it has a very scratchy care label on the inside, right above one of my hips. I would like it to be softer and/or behind my neck, but it also inspired me to think of putting the care label on the outside.

40/277

notexactly, Feb 03 2018

Fast Company: The next big thing in fashion? Not washing your clothes https://www.fastcom...ashing-your-clothes
Mentioned in my anno of this same date [notexactly, Jun 10 2019, last modified Jun 11 2019]

Fashion Revolution's Care Label Project - "Don't Overwash" https://web.archive...ge-the-way-we-care/
Mentioned in my anno; also linked from the Fast Company article, but the live version isn't showing images for me right now, so this is a link to an archived copy [notexactly, Jun 10 2019, last modified Jun 11 2019]

[link]






       Make 'em oversize as part of the fashion. Or maybe the care label is the shirt...
RayfordSteele, Feb 03 2018
  

       //care label is the shirt...// with wrap around ties.   

       If it's comfortable, it's probably a favourite. Read it, memorize and cut it out.
wjt, Feb 03 2018
  

       // I would like it to be softer and/or behind my neck //   

       You would like your hip to be softer and/or behind your neck ?   

       That is some seriously advanced yoga you're contemplating there ...
8th of 7, Feb 03 2018
  

       You must endure the discomfort and consider it a privilege for daring to even entertain the notion that you yourself are worthy of such an incredible garment which should be property of nothing less than a demigod.   

       ...and then you should hand wash it in penance using only one hand while self flagellating with the other using your own shoelaces.   

       Wet or dry shoelaces ?   

       With our without aiglets ?   

       If with, metal or plastic ?   

       These details are important and must not be neglected.
8th of 7, Feb 04 2018
  

       Wet of course. Aglets are mandatory but their material structure is optional.   

       //their material structure is optional// I had quite a lot of things like that, but I can't seem to find them just now.
pocmloc, Feb 08 2018
  

       //it has a very scratchy care label on the inside, right above one of my hips// Either you or the shirt is upside-down. Is it Australian ?
FlyingToaster, Feb 08 2018
  

       I have a few vests like this, and I was sufficiently interested in preventing the painful irritation (the label would end up directly under my belt and on my left side) that I cut the label off. The remaining stub was just as irritating, so I cut that out too, and ended up with a small hole there where the seam was cut. At least it now doesn’t irritate.
Ian Tindale, Feb 08 2018
  

       Shirley it would have been better just to excise a portion of dermal and adipose tissue on your left side, under your belt ? This would avoid damage to the garment, thus preserving its aesthetics and prolonging its service life.   

       Perhaps a shallow receptacle of folded waxed cardboard could be stapled into the aperture, providing a recess into which the tab would neatly fit ?
8th of 7, Feb 08 2018
  

       Unpicking the seam and re-sewing, works.
wjt, Feb 10 2018
  

       //Care labels on the outside// would be great for zoo animals and exotic pets, and would save a lot of anguish.
MaxwellBuchanan, Feb 10 2018
  

       // Unpicking the seam and re-sewing //   

       Well if [IT] is assembled using stitched seams, like Frankenstein's monster, it should be easy to fix.   

       We had always suspected that, but it's nice to be proved right.
8th of 7, Feb 10 2018
  

       i have spent at least four hours of my life unpicking/cutting off care labels from my clothes. To have them on the outside would be conducive to comfort, but ultimately the aesthetic crime of the century. The beef I have with care labels (besides the obvious, impossible-to-ignore scratchiness) is that they are UGLY. If they could only be designed with a kittle more 'care' as their name suggests, in multiple colours, embroidered with funky lettering and icons, or tasseled and even beaded, they could well be proudly displayed on the outside of clothing, thus attracting multiple potential mates, who'd possibly offer to buy one enpven more nicer clothes, with even more nicer care labels on them. One can only hope.
Edie, Feb 15 2018
  

       I just got some underwear with no tags, just gold print on the butt crack fabric. They should probably print it elsewhere for readability when necessary.
bigsleep, Feb 16 2018
  

       Well if anyone other than yourself is reading the information, you have a big problem, or then again perhaps not ...
8th of 7, Feb 17 2018
  

       Maybe that’s how dogs work.
Ian Tindale, Feb 17 2018
  

       New variation of this idea: Use care labels on the outside to promote less frequent washing in general as well as clothes designed to need less frequent washing.   

       I just read an interesting article from Fast Company [link], that was recommended by Pocket, on new clothing that doesn't need to be washed as often. It mentioned that even existing clothing is usually being overwashed, and also mentioned a campaign against overwashing [link]:   

       // While the brands I have featured in this story have made less frequent laundering a core part of their design and marketing, there’s a growing awareness among consumers over the last few years that we may be over-washing most of the clothes in our wardrobe. In 2017, the nonprofit Fashion Revolution, which promotes sustainability and social justice in the fashion industry, launched a major campaign called the Care Label Project to educate consumers about the environmental impact of over-washing their clothes. The organization partnered with the washing machine manufacturer AEG to help 14 designers incorporate labels that said “Don’t Overwash” into 18,200 styles of clothes. The point of the project was to make the case that the current system of care labels on clothes are [sic] antiquated. The symbols we find on our clothing tags were first invented half a century ago, and often they aren’t very carefully thought through. //   

       As they've developed it so far, their new "Don't Overwash" goes on the existing care label on the inside of the clothing.   

       I think my idea here, that of putting care labels on the outside of clothing where others can see them, could work well with that campaign, and for the new wash-less clothing brands. The Fast Company article mentioned that the brands are currently struggling to get people to try their clothing, partly because people might think they're being asked to be unhygienic.   

       My thought is that if these wash-less clothing brands had some clothes with the care labels on the outside, with a big "Don't Overwash" or similar (maybe a symbol, maybe with a number representing the suggested number of days of wear between washes), the idea of washing less might slowly get more mindshare, and it would be a distinctive thing for others to notice on the clothing, a bit like a logo but for a movement rather than a brand.   

       If any of these wash-less clothing companies want to put some care labels on the outside, I'd be all for it! I won't try to charge royalties or anything—I don't think this idea is something I could realistically keep proprietary even if I wanted to, being such a simple change. But sending me some samples would still be nice, and I can show my friends and tell them it was partly my idea :)
notexactly, Jun 11 2019
  
      
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