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Cooling for shuttle

Anyone have a link... graphene outer layer of a rentry surface of a spacecraft for cooling energy needs
 
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I saw a video on the net of graphene being burned, well actually a coating that would be applied and burned and it creates a potential voltage? or electricity i dont know.

Now put it on the outside of the hull of a reentering spacecraft (into our atmosphere) and use that energy created to cool the layer under the graphene. (Solid graphene)?

I think this has been done, i dont know.

vtolled, Aug 10 2010

//Anyone have a link// http://en.wikipedia...ic_reentry#Ablative
Close. [mouseposture, Aug 11 2010]

[link]






       //I think this has been done, i dont know.//   

       Yes. Old stuff.
ldischler, Aug 11 2010
  

       //use that energy to cool the layer under the graphene// say what now ?
FlyingToaster, Aug 11 2010
  

       Something's definitely wrong with this picture.
Custardguts, Aug 11 2010
  

       To cool something, you have to move the heat somewhere. Then you have to get rid of the heat. Given the amount of heat involved in re-entry, that would be a LOT of stuff devoted just to heat removal.   

       This is one of those things that, even if it could technically be made to work, it's just not remotely practical. With all the added complexity and weight that such a system would add, you're better off sticking with ablative insulation.
Freefall, Aug 11 2010
  

       after the ice comets have been moved into Earth orbit, just reshape them around earthbound shuttles.
FlyingToaster, Aug 11 2010
  
      
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