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Dog-Safe Chocolate

Engineer Some Chocolate to Make it Edible for Dogs
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from [URL moved to links area, below]

"Chocolate has a naturally occuring alkaloid, theobromine, that is similar to caffeine but not quite the same. It does behave as a stimulant.

I've recently read that, curiously, theobromine is quite poisonous to canines, with 4 oz. of dark chocolate capable of killing a 10 lb dog."

So is it possible to make an engineered variety of chocolate with the theobromine extracted from it, so it would be safe for dogs to eat? since dogs usually try to eat chocolate, i think they like it. if it was safe, they could have chocolate-covered meat snacks (sounds pretty nasty but i'm sure they'd love it).

dj_photon, Oct 18 2001

Link as a link http://www.halfbake...0breakfast_20cereal
[stupop, Oct 18 2001, last modified Oct 17 2004]

Dog-Safe Chocolate Treats http://www.catering...es.com/catalog.html
The first four items feature dog-safe chocolate. [Aristotle, Oct 18 2001, last modified Oct 17 2004]

Chocolate is Poisonous to Dogs http://www.vetheart.com/choc.html
28 Nov 02 | Looks like the amount for toxic reaction depends on the chocolate: "Just one ounce of unsweetened baking chocolate can kill a small breed dog." [bristolz, Oct 17 2004]


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Annotation:







       People appear to recommend carob (see link).
Aristotle, Oct 18 2001
  

       Even better: let's engineer some choccies that are guaranteed fatal to all dogs and stop the hairy fuckers barking all night.
sirrobin, Oct 18 2001
  

       Curiously enough, I share my dog's allergic reaction to chocolate and almost died from chocolate when I was young. This allergy actually works out rather well as my dogs have no danger of being exposed to chocolate b/c I don't buy any. Personally, I've tried carob and think it tastes horrible. If that is what chocolate tastes like....I don't understand why people like it.   

       [sirrobin], I can sympathize with you. However, the owners are at fault, not the dogs.
Susen, Oct 18 2001
  

       Dogs try to eat lots of stupid things, their own poop not the least of them. Just make ass-flavored brown stuff, drop it on the floor, and they'll love you forever.
StarChaser, Oct 18 2001
  

       Susen: Good point. Let's make chocolates that seek out and destroy evil dog owners.
sirrobin, Oct 19 2001
  

       I have a friend whose dog ate a huge amount of chocolate (~1kg, from memory). Oddly enough, it didn't seem to affect her, though.
cp, Oct 19 2001
  

       //Just make ass-flavored brown stuff, drop it on the floor, and they'll love you forever.//   

       Um, don't the dogs already do that themselves - the ones that aren't house-trained anyway?   

       On topic: There are loads of Doggie Choc type treats available in pet shops. I always assumed they weren't poisonous, but I could be wrong.
Guy Fox, Oct 19 2001
  

       Peter, did you live to a ripe old age?
po, Oct 20 2001
  

       Guy Fox: My point.
StarChaser, Oct 20 2001
  

       If you do the weight conversion , you'll realize that 4 oz of chocolate to a 10 lb dog is still a relatively large amount. That would be like 3.25 pounds to a 130 lb person, which is a *lot* of chocolate (enough to kill me, probably and I love the stuff). Also, the dog has to be of a breed prone to seizures to be at risk of dieing from such a small amount. Also: those big chunks of chocolate you can buy at some gourmet grocery stores are only about 5 oz.
eherot, Nov 28 2002
  


 

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