Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Number one on the no-fly list

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


 

LensFlusher

Flush, from underneath the eyelid, debris caught underneath the eyelid.
  (+2, -1)
(+2, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

So everyone here knows the annoyance a speck of sediment can cause when it finds its way underneath the eyelid? I mean way underneath, almost behind the eyeball. Normally, you can sweep stuff out from under eyelid A by pulling the lid over the eyelashes of eyelid B, but sometimes the foreign body is too far stuck to employ this technique.

Take an ordinary contact lens, and put a few capillaries through it that originate from the center and radiate outwards to the edge of the lens. Now put a nozzle at the radius of the lens, attach it to a tube, and attach the tube to a pump bottle of Visine, saline solution, or what have you. When properly inserted, it should look like you have a rubber tubule growing out of your eye. The lens should be fairly small, because you don't want to cover up too much of the eye. The lens should also be very thin.

To remove the crap underneath your eyelid, squeeze the pump (making sure to evacuate all air from the tube beforehand). The fluid flows through the tube, through the lens, and gently underneath the eyelid, carrying the particle to a different location. Hopefully, after one flush, the particle can be swept out using the method described above. If not, flush again.

The eyelid may bulge a small amount during the pumping.

Cuit_au_Four, Dec 05 2005

[link]





      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle