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Magnetic Fish

A new wave of genetic engineering
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Boneless fillets of fish aren't something all supermarkets are bless with. So instead of having to Heimlich your friends every time you serve fish, why not use genetic engineering to breed fish with magnetic bones, that way they're easy to remove just by "magneting" them out.
Debble, Dec 21 2001

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       [Debble] As you're new here, I'll let you in on a little secret: The veterans don't care for GE ideas.   

       That doesn't mean you can't post them, just that they won't be well received.   

       Aside from that, what [UnaBubba] said.
phoenix, Dec 21 2001
  

       Genetic engineering lets you take traits from one animal or plant and put them into another. It doesn't let you make fishes with metal bones.
pottedstu, Dec 21 2001
  

       I don't know about you all, but I've never observed the <<eat fish/need heimlich>> phenomenon Debble has referred to.
jimithing, Dec 21 2001
  

       queen mother has one or two times.
po, Dec 21 2001
  

       This isn't heckling. This is us being nice. Some evidence of magnetic animals would be useful in justifying this idea though.
pottedstu, Dec 21 2001
  

       It's a stretch, a really loooong stretch, but . . .

. . . there's critters of various kinds that are believed to have some kind of sensitivity to the earth's magnetic field. This would almost have to involve metallic compounds somewhere in the critters' neurology.

And lead, mercury, and arsenic accumulate in the bones of critters that ingest them. Granted, those are heavy metals, and not magnoresponsive [what's the right word for that?], but it at least shows that a lot of critters have a physiochemical mechanism for depositing metals in the bones. Hey, it's a start.

BTW: Boneless fish are easily achieved by pickling.
quarterbaker, Dec 21 2001
  

       You could perhaps blend a calicium-iron compound to put in the fishes food. But then, how would you stop them going rusty, particularly the marine species?
tight, Oct 06 2002
  

       Actually, you might be able to make bones sequester Iron instead of Calcium. They are both metals after all. Granted, Calcium's way more energetic than Iron is, which is why we don't use Calcuim to build stuff. Quick, what metals are ferrous and have more openings in the valence shell than Iron?
Madcat, Aug 27 2003
  
      
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