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Phonetic Alphabetical Order

alphabetical order based on location of sound in vocal tract
  (+3, -6)
(+3, -6)
  [vote for,
against]

An alphabetical order based on the location of the sound along the vocal tract. This would start with G or H (deep in the throat) and move on to K, Q, J, L, R, (SH) (CH) S T N D Z (TH) F V W P B M (lips), and either with the vowells interspersed or separate at the end: A E I O U
JesusHChrist, Jan 19 2005

IPA/X-Sampa Chart http://www.i-foo.co.../misc/xsamchart.gif
[[ sctld ], Jan 19 2005]

[link]






       Out of curiosity, are you familiar with   

       0 = AEHIOUWY
1 = BFPV
2 = CGJKQSXZ
3 = DT
4 = L
5 = MN
6 = R
  

       Take a word and replace the digits according to the list above. If the same digit is repeated two or more times in a row, strike all but one. Finally, remove all the zeroes.   

       Although this system sometimes produces identical codes for completely different words (21623 maps to both "supercat" and "expressed"), names and words which are pronounced similarly will usually map to the same code. Although there are some names and words for which this method will not work well ("threw" and "through" get assigned different codes, for example) it actually works amazingly given its simplicity.
supercat, Jan 19 2005
  

       what is wrong with the current alphabet? id vote against this twice if i could
willywilliams, Jan 19 2005
  

       This wouldn't work in English because many letters have two sounds, or their sound overlaps with other letter's sound. Take "George" as an example. This sound is /dj/, the normal sound of <j> in the English alphabet. <th> is actually two sounds, /T/ and /D/. Compare <this> and <thistle>. And <ch> is /tS/   

       Vowels can be ordered by two scales: tongue position and open-ness. Again, vowels have multiple values. Also, where would <y>, the semi-vowel go?
[ sctld ], Jan 19 2005
  

       We'd need a new name for the alphabet then, since that name is based on the first two letters, A and B. Does "Could you order the letters in GH-ically order, please" sound right?
jstf, Jan 19 2005
  

       There is no reason whatsoever to do this to a perfectly good alphabet, but I'm voting [+] because the idea really tickles my fancy and seems to be under fire.
wagster, Jan 19 2005
  

       oniony: Yes, I know it's soundex. Wanted to see who else would recognize it. Soundex is actually probably the closest thing practical to this form of lexicographic ordering, and is indeed useful.
supercat, Jan 19 2005
  

       I would vote for a new alphabet / language based on human impersonations of Dolphins, with orally produced fart noises as vowels.   

       'click click whistle trumppp!'
etherman, Jan 19 2005
  
      
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