Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Why on earth would you want that many gazelles anyway?

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                               

Printed colored architectural glass

Just like those cake printers that print images on cakes we print fusable glass frit on glass then have a laser melt it to create transparent colored art glass windows
  (+17)(+17)
(+17)
  [vote for,
against]

I was epiphanatically thrilled when I viewed the Tiffany windows at the NY metropolitan museum (link)

Printing tiny drops of fusible colored glass frit onto a transparent plane of glass much like a compucakedecorator then melting the frit with a laser creates a new kind of colored glass art suitable to architecture

Going just a little further the glass could have a reflective layer that when the laser etched an angle the light would be reflected to a different area of the window (there is a chance that you have seen those fluorescent Battery things at groceries that appear to glow brightly as a result of redirected light)

I am thinking secular use printing entire windows

beanangel, Jun 09 2010

Tiffany Window http://www.awesomes...user/2e1b415206.jpg
[beanangel, Jun 09 2010]

computer printed cake with viewable source code http://www.unplggd..../081208_sz_cake.jpg
[beanangel, Jun 09 2010]

frit http://www.answers.com/topic/frit
[po, Jun 09 2010]

[xenzag]'s link as a link http://www.materia.nl/
[po, Jun 09 2010]

Tuneable LASERs http://en.wikipedia...dely_tunable_lasers
A work in progress, obviously. [8th of 7, Jun 09 2010]

Printed glass http://www.shapeway...y_white_matte_glass
not colored... yet [afinehowdoyoudo, Jun 11 2010]

[link]






       Before posting any material variation.... like flexible concrete, check here first. www.materia.nl You'll probably find that it's already being manufactured.
xenzag, Jun 09 2010
  

       Thats a superb site   

       I was timid about registering though so I searched it computer glass site: materia.nl   

       There are two or three computer controlled laser etched glass methods as well as a computer controlled bulk glass casting   

       Amazingly Computer Printed laser fused glass frit is new to a search of glass computer at materia
beanangel, Jun 09 2010
  

       not sure how you mean to apply the colors to glass but look up 'lamp work' to see how colors are added to glass in the old method.
dentworth, Jun 09 2010
  

       Rather than frit, you probably need to apply the colouring agent in some sort of volatile carrier liquid , then after evaporation, fuse it into the glass using a device analagous to a laser printer fuser unit.   

       Using staic charge, the glass could be pre coated with the carrier, the powdered pigment applied by a laser-printer type print engine, then again the thermal fusing process.
8th of 7, Jun 09 2010
  

       well I think of frit as powdered mineral glass plus coloring minerals that becomes liquid glass on heating with a laser Window glass is currently etched with lasers so I think melting is also possible
beanangel, Jun 09 2010
  

       An IR laser ? You'll have to check the absorbtion spectra of your pigments carefully, and choose a laser wavelength which will excite the pigment (or carrier) efficiently. Your puny Earthling technology has not yet developed lasers that are tuneable over a wide range of wavelengths.   

       <link>
8th of 7, Jun 09 2010
  

       Why is a laser necessary? Wouldn't it be easier to just bake the pane of glass after color has been applied?   

       Of course, if you also want to have an internal reflective layer, selectively etched, *that* might need to be done via laser, but that can be done as an entirely separate step -- done before applying pigments, or after baking.
goldbb, Jun 09 2010
  

       This is a jolly good idea.
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 22 2012
  

       I have to agree with [goldbb]. Start with a bare pane and print the color on it with an adhesive that will evaporate under the softening temperature of glass. Then kiln bake the entire pane, which is common enough in glass shops already.
MechE, Oct 22 2012
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle