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Refrigerator/Freezer heatsink

use/dispose of the heat from these applicances
 
(+2, -2)
  [vote for,
against]

Fridges and freezers remove heat from their insides by releasing it on the outside, basically, they move heat. This is heat that you may want ( it is winter or otherwise cold ), or you may not want it (it is summer/hot ). As a consequence, you should be able to determine if this heat is going out of your house or not. When you don't want the heat, direct it out of the house, when you want it, keep it inside. This could be done by some sort of heat sink leading to the outside of the house coupled with a thermostat.
joarvat, Jun 19 2002

[link]






       Simply use a fan to draw air over the cooling elements and use tubes to direct the warmed air in or out of the house. Tumbledriers already do this, so do cars.
Mayfly, Jun 19 2002
  

       My god, man, you've invented the air conditioner!
StarChaser, Jun 20 2002
  

       Perhaps a cove for the fridge, open in front, insulated (as is the fridge itself of course) around the front. Back end adjoins the room that is always hot. Inside this room is water heaters, light bulbs, coffeepots, discus tanks and other hot objects. There is an extra nicely insulated wall between the room that is always hot and the adjoining room that is always cold. This contains the air conditioner side of the air conditioner, the freezer, and the humidor. Both these rooms have exterior doors, but one is used only in winter. Whether the one used in winter should be the one closer to Ecuador is unclear. Maybe it makes no difference. The room that is always hot and the room that is always cold, have the combined shape of an hourglass. This minimizes the area of the insulated wall between them and maximzes the area of rooms not obligated to be hot or cold.
LoriZ, Jun 20 2002
  

       Perhaps a cove for the fridge, open in front, insulated (as is the fridge itself of course) around the front. Back end adjoins the room that is always hot. Inside this room is water heaters, light bulbs, coffeepots, discus tanks and other hot objects. There is an extra nicely insulated wall between the room that is always hot and the adjoining room that is always cold. This contains the air conditioner side of the air conditioner, the freezer, and the humidor. Both these rooms have exterior doors, but one is used only in winter. Whether the one used in winter should be the one closer to Ecuador is unclear. Maybe it makes no difference. The room that is always hot and the room that is always cold, have the combined shape of an hourglass. This minimizes the area of the insulated wall between them and maximzes the area of rooms not obligated to be hot or cold.
LoriZ, Jun 20 2002
  

       This reminds me, a couple years ago I had a neighbor who, when it was hot, would open his refrigerater in hopes of cooling his apartment. + for you.   

       note though that this idea was already mentioned in 'Refrigerator Cold Air Vent'
kurleykyew, Jun 20 2003
  
      
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