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Retro-un-pseudo-science name-hijacking

Re-use some words
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I was thinking about a name, a word, for a concept related to entropy (in the thermodynamic sense) - and “order”.

Extropy seemed to have a “kind-of-appropriate” sound to it, so I looked it up.

Damned if it’s not already used for something non- scientific.

Finding that some alternative therapies (and alternative philosophies) liberally steal scientific and/or technical terms and use them in confusing, misleading ways, why not turn the tables.

The nearest existent examples I can think of is the naming of planetary bodies after Roman/Greek/Other deities.

I’m off to realign the chakras of a 1988 VW scirocco now, see if I can get it running smoothly.

Frankx, Oct 02 2021

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       Did you know that acupuncture is the technical term for the fitting* of a threaded rod into a threaded hole? (acu= accurate, puncture=inserting a thing into another thing).   

       So an acupuncturist is the man at the hardware store, who can take your unidentified bolt and rummage in his boxes and find the correct nut that fits it.   

       *note that there is no other common word for this; flat surfaces "mate" with one another and curved surfaces "fey", but threaded surfaces "acupuncture"
pocmloc, Oct 02 2021
  

       With this system, could we stop pseudo- scientists from using 'psychodynamic', which was originally coined to sound like "thermodynamic"?
pertinax, Oct 02 2021
  

       Nice [pocmloc]!   

       [pertinax] - yes for “psychodynamic”, if we use it as a name for a genuinely scientifically defined property.
Frankx, Oct 02 2021
  
      
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