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Science Energy Nuclear Waste

Can someone let me know if any tests have been done
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Imagine a thin sheet made of a beta-emitter, and a thin sheet of copper, with a thin, wide carbon mesh in between as an insulator. put another carbon mesh on top of this "sandwich" and roll it up. It would look like a carbon-mesh swiss roll, but it would be basically a battery that would be as long-lasting and powervul as the half-life and energy-level of your beta-emitter. Nickel-63 has a half-life of 100 years, but it has a maximum energy level of only 0.067 Mev. That's not going to do at all. Doing some digging, I found that the two best beta-emitter sources would be either Strontium-90 with a half-life of 29 years and an energy level of 0.546 Mev, or Technetium-99 with a half-life of 212, 000 years and an energy level of 0.292 Mev. Of course, studying uses of these sources led me to stumble onto Paul Brown's work, so I knew someone else had a similar notion. He used Strontium-90 which produced MORE than enough energy, but its half-life would be within most anyone's lifetime. Using Technetium-99, a battery could be made, that if as efficient as Paul Brown's battery, would produce perhaps 2/3 the power, but would practically never run out. Direct conversion of beta radiation to electricity is possible, as proven my the Cornell students, so why not harness it? Cliff notes: instead of a conventional sandwich, try a "wrap", and focus on beta particle
Jsebesta, Sep 16 2009

Wikipedia: Atomic Batteries http://en.wikipedia...wiki/Atomic_battery
Is this the kind of thing you're thinking of [Jsebesta]? [zen_tom, Sep 16 2009]

[link]






       What's the idea? Nuclear batteries powered by radioactive decay? If so, then they're already in active use in various space-craft, probes etc. I think they're generally known as "Atomic Batteries".
zen_tom, Sep 16 2009
  

       Sort of. Most "Atomic" batteries are actually a thermopile, using the decay heat of an isotope as the energy source. Beta-capture is a known technology, but not without its problems.   

       When the primary isotope decays, it doesn't necessarily become stable (unless the daughter isotope is lead). It may subsequently emit further energetic particles or gamma radiation. Alphas are a problem because they lead to a slow but steady accumulation of helium within the device (Whic means venting). Gammas are not good because they demand heavy shielding.   

       Fine for deep-space probes and the like but you're not going to be popping a few of them in your Maglite or iPod any day soon ....
8th of 7, Sep 16 2009
  

       Science isn't just an energy, it's a specific process, used to allow all sorts of things to work; photographic printers, mobile phones, the internet......and many other devices.
kaz, Sep 16 2009
  

       Good point, but what generates this science energy? I've taken apart loads of stuff and most of the time the only sort of energy I can find being supplied is lousy old electricity.
kaz, Sep 16 2009
  

       Ahem. CLASS....did anyone say "hello" to Jsebesta? He's new here, I think. It looks like this is kinda baked, but still a good ish idea, so have a [+] from me.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 16 2009
  

       see betavoltaics in link (not mine) Hello.
Sparkyplugclean, Sep 16 2009
  

       // what generates this science energy? //   

       Grant committees.
8th of 7, Sep 17 2009
  

       Apparently, women can use it to cause blindness. -- science energy, not smoke.
CaptainClapper, Sep 17 2009
  

       Hello everyone. It is true I am new at this. I have been very curious on how batteries can be made to last a lifetime. I am also concerned about the nuclear waste that is currently being stored away. I do not want to create more nuclear waste. I wanted to find out if we can use the existing nuclear waste to help build batteries. Given the work of Cornell students along with Paul Brown, as well as possible others, can we create such a Battery using the beta radiation off of nuclear waste. Any thoughts?
Jsebesta, Sep 17 2009
  

       [marked-for-engineering]   

       see if that helps...
CaptainClapper, Sep 17 2009
  

       Sorry. Hello [JseBesta] *waves*
kaz, Sep 17 2009
  

       // to last a lifetime //   

       Shouldn't that be "half-lifetime" in this context ?
8th of 7, Sep 17 2009
  

       *Beta waves*   

       P.S. your tag cloud is showing.
egbert, Sep 17 2009
  

       I've talked to a friend a Laurence berkeley lab about commercializing space batteries, more or less, and it's technically doable, but legally and commercially tough, if not impossible. Croissant for a good halfbaked idea. Welcome!
white, Sep 19 2009
  

       I've talked to a friend a Laurence berkeley lab about commercializing space batteries, more or less, and it's technically doable, but legally and commercially tough, if not impossible. Croissant for a good halfbaked idea. Welcome!
white, Sep 19 2009
  

       I've talked to a friend a Laurence berkeley lab about commercializing space batteries, more or less, and it's technically doable, but legally and commercially tough, if not impossible. Croissant for a good halfbaked idea. Welcome!
white, Sep 19 2009
  

       I think you are right, [UnaBubba]. As to the idea, [Jsebesta]: It all hinges on whether Paul Brown was right, and it sure does not look that way; If the magic acceleration does not work as advertised, it si just another atomic battery, with all the security and peak-power problems attached.
loonquawl, Sep 22 2009
  

       [Jsebesta], welcome to the halfbakery. Will you please use some paragraph breaks so your idea is easier to read? J   

       ust hit [Enter] twice every so often and I'll be happy.   

       Thanks.
normzone, Sep 22 2009
  
      
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