Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Superlidz

Hey, other animals have them.
 
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Introducing the superlid. It's a finely arranged layer of microfilaments that looks like a plastic film. You put this filmy microlayer on your eye and it does things for you. It should be semipermeable to allow for contact with normal ocular fluids and virtually noninvasive.

Potential applications are almost mostly limitless.

[edit]

Ok. So, I'm thinking that the film should cover the entire eye. Surely there is a maximum thickness with no invasive feelings. Yes, it is like a contact lens, but it should cover the entire eyeball. The added surface area (beyond the visible portion) can house microelectronics, drugs, etc... This is a halfbakery idea, hopefully, and as such I want it to be as limitless in application as possible.

It will not be able to make sandwiches, [Texticle]. My apologies.

daseva, Jul 05 2007

Nictitating Membrane http://www.answers....ictitating-membrane
[BJS, Jul 06 2007]

Nano-engineered contact lens drug delivery http://www.newscien...rticle.ns?id=dn6597
Made by tiny, tiny opticians. [jutta, Jul 06 2007]

[link]






       What things, exactly, does it do for you? And how?
MaxwellBuchanan, Jul 05 2007
  

       I suppose making me a sandwich is too much to ask.
Texticle, Jul 06 2007
  

       Like grillz for you lidz, homey.
nuclear hobo, Jul 06 2007
  

       is it a contact lens?
xaviergisz, Jul 06 2007
  

       I think it's a nictating membrane...that doesn't nictate.   

       I thought it was supposed to be like a crocodile's transparent eye lids.
BJS, Jul 06 2007
  

       mmmm - operculum!
csea, Jul 06 2007
  

       There have been experiments with slow release drugs permeated into a contact lens. I don't know what ever became of them and I can't be arsed to google it before my morning coffee. Coffee! What Am I doing here on the halfbakery pre-caffinated? Am I mad? These people will EAT ME ALIVE! Some of them are English! They have been up for hours. They have probably already had tea and crumpets, or whatever it is they eat over there. What is a crumpet anyway. I should probably delete this anno. But first I need to make coffee.
Galbinus_Caeli, Jul 06 2007
  

       // What is a crumpet anyway.   

       You know, when you get something cheap that doesn't really have much play value, like one of those really small turtles, or a cockroach.
jutta, Jul 06 2007
  

       It's the start of an idea, but it needs some more detailed application examples to be an invention.
Heathera, Jul 06 2007
  

       What? A crumpet? Or this idea? Both probably.
wagster, Jul 06 2007
  

       Never have one of my ideas sparked so much brilliance. [GC], coffeeless baking is a sin, get thee to a bunnery! Ocular drug delivery is a well established concept, whilst superlidz are not, methinks. The novelty here is how it covers the entire eyeball and provides hidden space for technologies.
daseva, Jul 09 2007
  

       "one of those really small turtles, or a cockroach"   

       Forty-eight hours later, it hits me. And now I have the whole evening ahead of me to suffer.
normzone, Jul 09 2007
  

       [normzone] As they say, "He who laughs last, thinks slowest."
Galbinus_Caeli, Jul 09 2007
  

       Whereas Crumbpets are another thing entirely, but could also be cockroaches, too. Or would that be crumbpests?
Ling, Jul 09 2007
  

       No, crumbpests are more specialized. Like indian meal moths (Plodia interpunctella).
Galbinus_Caeli, Jul 09 2007
  

       //get thee to a bunnery!//   

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