Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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The Santa Claus Virus

Santa Claus is red - so let's do a bit of social redistribution.
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This Virus consists of two parts: Part one tries to get financial information, especially credit card data, from a random victim's internet transactions. As soon as enough information for plundering the account is collected, the second part seeks out another random 'victim' at a site which allows the formulation of 'wish lists', e.g. amazon, plunders the account it has hacked into and fulfills the wishes on the list. A more sophisticated version could go into 'Robin Hood' mode and check the accounts of both people involved so it only takes from the rich and gives to the poor.
Saruman, Sep 23 2003

Mexican version of Santa Claus http://www.inside-m....com/reyesoscar.htm
The Three Wizard Kings day is the closest translation I can come up with. My sisters and I were lucky enough to get presents from Santa Claus AND the Wizard Kings. I don't know how fair that is. [Pericles, Oct 04 2004]

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       The red suit with white trimmings and the floppy hat was created by Thomas Nast in 1863, modelled on the traditional garb of an Eastern Orthodox bishop, which is what St. Nicholas was. Nothing to do with Coca Cola.   

       And St. Nicholas got to be a saint for redistributing his own wealth, not other people's. Robin Hood never made it to canonization, let alone beatification, but I think that would be a much more suitable eponym.
DrCurry, Sep 23 2003
  

       Thor, the god of presents? Interesting.
RayfordSteele, Sep 23 2003
  

       Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of children too, which accounts for him filling their stockings. In germany, well south germany, the presents are brought by the Christkindl or christ child although he/she/it looks like a fairy or cherub. Saint Nicholaus brings round sweeties and things ( or leaves them in shoes left outside the door) on his saints day, (6th December) but is seen walking around for a while afterwards doing the same. He wears a red bishop's robe. Rather worryingly, he is often accompanied by an anti-santa figure called Knecht Ruprecht (also the german name for Santa's Little Helper in The Simpsons) who wears a grey robe and carries a sack and a stick for beating and carrying off naughty children.   

       A bit more of an incentive for being good than adults telling you half-heartedly "you'll only get soot and coal if you're bad".
squeak, Sep 24 2003
  

       ...so maybe we should invent a Knecht Ruprecht virus that finds out who instigated the Santa Claus virus, finds out where they live and then sends a mercenary round to hit them with a stick.
squeak, Sep 24 2003
  

       I don't know if i'll be able to trust what comes out of your mouth anymore UnaBubba
Mind_Boggle, Sep 25 2003
  

       Although the mexican kids raised in rich families get presents from Santa Claus, our unique tradition is to celebrate the "Reyes Magos" day (see link).   

       The tradition is taken from the three wise men who traveled to Betlehem to give newborn jesus Christ three symbolic presents. So, each mexican kid is supposed to find three presents under the christmas tree on january 6. Obviously, it's understood that most kids' parents can't afford the presents (let alone ONE present) so poor children usually get symbolic and meaningful things made by their parents or older relatives, such as wooden toys, corn pastries or dolls made of fabric.
Pericles, Sep 25 2003
  

       um, i think the idea is fun. but it could definately go too far.
changokun, Feb 21 2004
  


 

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