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Titanium-Aramid Glasses

iSafe
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For those times when you really don't want an eye injury, try Ti-Ar glasses and sunglasses. With a projectile-proof lens in the form-hugging frames, they will deflect all sorts of crap from your precious peepers.

Of course, they are totally opaque, so they have tiny CCD "lenses" on the front of them, feeding to small, very high resolution screens on the back, so you can see what you're doing; where you're going, etc. In addition, autofocus, zoom, infrared and light intensification technology have been built in.

Lightweight and incredibly tough, they're just like your real eyes, only better for you in a sandstorm / battle / squash game or champagne fight.

UnaBubba, Feb 05 2013

In regard's to MBs Comment http://xkcd.com/941/
[MechE, Feb 05 2013]

Actual body armor for your eyes. http://www.bulletpr...on.shtml#Faceshield
Can a "titanium aramid blend" stop a 9mm FMJ fired from an MP5 submachine gun? [DIYMatt, Feb 05 2013]


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Annotation:







       A regular pair of polycarbonate lenses that you can see through are probably *almost* as good for protection.
DIYMatt, Feb 05 2013
  

       "Almost" ain't good enough. These are basically body armour for your eyes and far more complicated than anything clear.
UnaBubba, Feb 05 2013
  

       Did I not mention that?
UnaBubba, Feb 05 2013
  

       So, how much is "good enough" eye protection going to cost me?
whlanteigne, Feb 05 2013
  

       How much is your sight worth?
UnaBubba, Feb 05 2013
  

       I don't like the CCD idea, as it is too prone to failure. Chances are if I am in a situation where I am worried about projectiles, I will probably also be as worried about my glasses leaving me blind as a bat. Couldn't you do the work with mirrors? Like a periscope but without the massive offset. Either way the optics are now the weak link in the system, but replacing broken mirrors could be easy.
MisterQED, Feb 05 2013
  

       I wonder what it would be like to have periscope glasses that raised your point of view by six inches, or indeed separated (more than normally) the effective distance between your eyes.
MaxwellBuchanan, Feb 05 2013
  

       I've been wearing eyeglasses since 1960, and I've found the traditional "safety" lenses* and frames to be more than adequate when eye protection is required (industrial settings). I've never had a need for full body armor.   

       "Safety" lenses and frames can cost about twice as much as regular.   

       *("Safety" lenses are 2mm thick at the thinnest part, as opposed to 1mm thick for "non-safety" lenses)
whlanteigne, Feb 05 2013
  

       If the CCD fails you always have the option of replacing it or taking off the glasses to revert to use of a Mk1 eyeball.
UnaBubba, Feb 05 2013
  

       I'm sure that's the case. The visual image of someone wearing completely opaque glasses and walking around, obviously sighted, appeals.
UnaBubba, Feb 05 2013
  

       At one time (and possibly still today), Mercedes and Jaguar used wolfram, an ore material from which titanium is refined, to create special photoreactive tinted glass for their cars. Research in that general diraction might help remedy the opacity dilemma.
Alterother, Feb 06 2013
  

       Are you trying to make the lenses opaque or merely to appear opaque, [Alter]?
UnaBubba, Feb 06 2013
  

       Actually, I was thinking about making them less opaque. Sort of somewhat transparent, perhaps.
Alterother, Feb 06 2013
  

       Where's the fun in that? I set out to deliberately make them opaque, for visual effect.
UnaBubba, Feb 07 2013
  

       Something like these are already used for high-power laser work, where you Do Not Want the laser anywhere near your eyes. (Cameras are relatively easy to replace.)
sninctown, Feb 07 2013
  

       Tungsten. Right. My mistake. Thank you.   

       It's still worth looking into.
Alterother, Feb 07 2013
  

       Could work well for faceshields in hazardous workplaces, especially in smelting and welding industries, where flash burns are a problem.
UnaBubba, Feb 15 2013
  

       Could and has, until the mid-70s apparently. Now we have LCD auto-darkeners.
Alterother, Feb 15 2013
  


 

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