Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


     

Toothboard for computer tablets/other teeny devices

  (+2)
(+2)
  [vote for,
against]

Whilst talking nonsense at work - for a change, my student and I realised that an input device for computer tablets and other kinds of small devices is readily available...in the shape of teeth.

A normal human has 32 teeth easily covering the Latin Alphabet with only a modicum of multiplexing. For example the lower case can come from the lower set of teeth and upper case from...well the upper set. See how easy it is to remember?

The device has two sets of braces, one for upper and lower, and small stylus. A modest electrical current* runs between the two when they are in contact.

As an added bonus, two sets of false teeth can be rigged into one of ergonomic keyboards, letting old couples join in the technology fest that is the internet.

As an added-added bonus, you can also use the stylus to winkle out stubborn bits of cabbage and whatnot, in fact the initial marketing slogan was the (goodbye) Cabbage (see the) Difference Engine.

I rest my case, and my incisors.

*At little as 13 amps should do the trick.

not_morrison_rm, Jul 04 2014

[link]






       So you have a hands free input device. I6 different switches, if your jaws are free and easy. With dentures you can have as many teeth as are useful.   

       You'll need to spit out the whole mess, if the phone rings.   

       Breathing and swallowing?
popbottle, Jul 04 2014
  

       //Breathing and swallowing   

       Pshaw! Minor details...
not_morrison_rm, Jul 04 2014
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle