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Very slightly improved mobile phone ringtone

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Many people have, as their mobile phone ringtone, something which sounds like an old-fashioned non-mobile phone which had actual bells inside which were hit with a tiny vibrating hammer. This is pleasing to the ear (at least, more so than many mobile phone ringtones) and a nice nod to the venerable history of electronic communications technology.

The glaring problem with these electronic simulations of the sound of physical bells (and you will notice this every time you hear it, now that I've pointed it out) is that when the person receiving the call presses the button or swipes or whatever to pick up the call ("pick up" itself being a reference to phones with handsets) the computer-generated bell noise cuts off instantly whereas, with a real phone with physical bells being hit by a hammer, the hammer would stop hitting the bells but the sound of the bell which had just been struck would sustain* for a few seconds. This flaw in the simulated bell sound is (a) annoying, and (b) grossly lazy on the part of phone designers

So, this idea is that we should use the vast processing power of modern phones to better simulate the bell sound in these ringtones, and generate a gradually decaying bell chime which continues for a second or two after the call is answered.


(*Nigel Tufnel: The sustain, listen to it.
Marty DiBergi: I don't hear anything.
Nigel Tufnel: Well you would though, if it were playing)
hippo, Oct 24 2017

[link]






       Having been enrolled into the OptOut scheme for bunning, and finding no fault with this idea, I hereby [+]
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 24 2017
  

       [+] Obviously the simulation should be taken further, the call can be ended in the normal manner, but if the DA is on your ass and the chief has given you 8 hours to nail the perp, you need to end calls more forcefully, with a nice little "cladiiiiiiinnnnggg".
bs0u0155, Oct 24 2017
  

       <Quasimodo>   

       "The bells ! The bells ! "   

       </Quasimodo>
8th of 7, Oct 24 2017
  

       Maybe a 'slam phone' sort of hangup button on the next Android release.
RayfordSteele, Oct 24 2017
  

       An improved bell-end [+]
bhumphrys, Oct 24 2017
  

       You just had to go and spoil it, didn't you, [bh] ?   

       It's not big, and it's not clever.
8th of 7, Oct 24 2017
  

       First it's ringtones and then its the universe. The phenomena you are chasing is called 'Escaping the uncanny valley' or "let's zoom in on something irrelevant rather than call for the jailing of some politicians and directors".   

       We did this with LED bulbs as a replacement for filament bulbs so that when you back off the lights, they dim for a fraction of a second rather than just shut off instantly.   

       How long is a fraction of a second ? Glad you asked. We just kind of bought into the 20-30 frames per second gig. It turns out that 4K means crap and 60 FPS comes first - look for some videos, it turns out that the 60 FPS trick is how GoPro got its sales. 60 FPS slo-mo is obviously easy, but 60 FPS realtime is incredible. Very few movies were recorded above 25 FPS.   

       The 25 / 60 FPS debate is very interesting as it implies that the human brain can gather more information from a faster frame rate rather than higher resolution. It makes sense as the human brain is highly tuned to movement, particularly in facial expressions, and in other human movements you can see so many more nuances.   

       What kind of worries me in the quest to remove the uncanny valley is that protocols and standards that allow any uncannyness will fall from favour.
bigsleep, Oct 25 2017
  

       25 FPS was determined by the limitations of mechanical film transports and the strength of the film itself, plus the persistence of vision that gives an acceptable illusion of smooth motion.   

       For TV, that meant that to show movies the frame and line rates had to somehow be matched to the film, since in the early days of TV, magnetic tape was uncommon, and a lot of material was on cine film.   

       It's rather like the 4' 8 1/2" rail gauge- it's what worked in the beginning, and now you're stuck with it.
8th of 7, Oct 26 2017
  

       //and now you're stuck with it.//   

       We can still choose between 60 FPS and UHD because they are both uncommon. 60 FPS and HD seems better to me and where I want to spend my money.
bigsleep, Oct 26 2017
  

       Once the smoothness is obtained, isn't how much the individual can subconsciously catch?   

       So a 4K brain means the 4K absorb-able differential between frames at 60 FPS. Then again, just watch it again.
wjt, Oct 26 2017
  

       //Then again, just watch it again//   

       Increased resolution or frame rate or ways of tackling anti-aliasing which seeks to remove the Hitchcock shower scene in every pixel.   

       //just watch it again//   

       Do you mean that any 3rd party reality has a necessary second watch ? I can guess the reasoning, but I think you deserve the glory for rolling it out.
bigsleep, Oct 26 2017
  

       Depth comes from doing more time, seeing nuances. If it interested then it is possibly worth getting more out. A second viewing, then again, may totally reverse the initial view.
wjt, Oct 26 2017
  

       //Depth comes from doing more time, seeing nuances.//   

       Agreed. Ideally a TV would be like a mirror running at 1000 FPS in realtime. A second take is a completely different thing.
bigsleep, Oct 26 2017
  

       [8th] //It's rather like the 4' 8 1/2" rail gauge// - the rail gauge measurement derives from the distance between the neck and ankles of the SI damsel in distress.
hippo, Oct 26 2017
  
      
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