Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Not so much a thought experiment as a single neuron misfire.

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WickWear

Thousands of absorbent, frayed wicks embedded perpendicular to the plane made by the warp and weft.
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This is an activewear fabric designed to hasten the evaporation of perspiration without resorting to a porous mesh found in many dry-weave garments. The bulk of the cloth is made of a synthetic, non-absorbent polymer. Permeating this supporting layer are many thousands of absorbent microfibers, which are stiffer at the end inside the garment and frayed at the end exposed to the environment. The idea is that these fibers absorb moisture, and the frayed ends increase the surface area so it evaporates quickly. Unlike a mesh, light does not penetrate the cloth, so the exposure to UV is minimized.
Cuit_au_Four, Aug 03 2010

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       ahh... so... nothing to do with the science behind spontaneous human combustion then?
James Newton, Aug 03 2010
  

       Sounds itchy.   

       Hiker wear is already woven in such a way, and with such materials (polypropylene for example) as to promote wicking.
BunsenHoneydew, Aug 04 2010
  

       [Bunsen], you thought itchy. I read this as WickerWear. Now THAT'S itchy.
Cedar Park, Aug 05 2010
  

       How does polypropylene promote wicking? It's about as hydrophilic as candle wax.
MaxwellBuchanan, Aug 05 2010
  

       Polypropylene can be treated to be hydrophilic. In this form, over 50% of the product manufactured today is used in diapers.
Cedar Park, Aug 05 2010
  

       Would the wicker man have worn this? +
whatrock, Jun 01 2017
  

       hmmm - this is just velvet isn't it?
hippo, Jun 01 2017
  
      
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