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Billions of better button batteries

use a millifiore battery form that uses less materials produces better electricity is cheaper to as 7 billion watches may cause 7 billion button batteries
 
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Readers have likely seen polymer or glass millifiore beads with really high resolution, the artisan just makes a huge image then rolls it thinner to create the bead miniature.

Well, this idea employs a detailed electrolyte conductor sandwich pattern with even niftier geometry to create a linear voltaic multilayer structure that gets millifiored to button battery size.

Then the O sides that might look rather like grids get an electroplating of conductor to create the preferred voltage as well as amps from the numerous layers. The long sides of course are a nonconductive structural polymer.

Even niftier is that the two plated contact surfaces of the battery could rest on a multipath contact thus the actual electronic device could decide if it preferred 1v 2v or 3v at various amps, this gives the battery peak as well as sustain power giving electronics better longevity as well as capability.

"Forsooth", I hear a reasonable critic say, "batteries are moist, how will you draw a millifiore gel to a button while keeping it yuckless?"

a few options, make the entire thing below the melting point of the electrolyte, make the electrolyte layers actually kind of like sponges or hygroscopic surfaceed channels then soak them to absorb the active electrolyte

I was looking at a 99c place watch with all of its numerous parts then thought that each part could be made better as well as cheaper as it is possible that those developing worlders might like spending less than .5 hour to acquire a digital watch, so, how to get an entire digital watch to less than a dime

Well along with things like EPS, touch capacitance (or photosensor on IC) nonbuttons, a new kind of field effect transistor to place at the IC to skip the crystal, was the idea of creating a new kind of battery

Perhaps 10 or 20 billion button batteries or more were produced during 2011, thus could be reengineered to a new better polymer version that is ecopowerniftyriffic (rumor has it that making metal batteries takes more energy than they give, mostly polymer n electrolyte millifiore batteries with plated contacts are ecobetter)

beanangel, Jan 18 2012

millifiore beads http://www.flickr.c...s/z/in/photostream/
[beanangel, Jan 18 2012]

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       //ecopowerniftyriffic//   

       ...watch as a new word enters the English language and takes its first baby steps...living up the HB motto "forward in all directions!!!"
not_morrison_rm, Jan 18 2012
  

       forsooth indeed.
WcW, Jan 18 2012
  

       Your explanation is not clear enough to enable anyone to visualize this.   

       You could do something like this by:   

       (1) Create a sandwich of (from the top down) insulator /anode /electrolyte /cathode.   

       (2) Rolling this up into a Swiss roll, many tens of centimetres in diameter   

       (3) Running this through dies to elongate and narrow it, until your Swiss roll is the same diameter as a button cell   

       (4) Slicing this into sections, each as thick as a button cell   

       (e) attach the anode to the casing on one face of the slice and the cathode to the terminal on the other face of the slice.   

       (This is roughly similar to the way they make electrolytic capacitors, though I'm not sure if they go through the stretch-and-narrow step.)
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 18 2012
  

       // I'm not sure if they go through the stretch-and-narrow step. //   

       No, because although this does produce a slimmer and more cost-effective device, the downside was that the process caused them to stop working.
8th of 7, Jan 18 2012
  

       //although this does produce a slimmer and more cost-effective device, the downside was that the process caused them to stop working.//   

       Ah - like with hamsters, yes?
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 18 2012
  

       I said "no comment". Well, OK, I didn't but I meant to.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 18 2012
  
      
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