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Complete the Cycle

For those who have mastered their Circadian rhythms.
 
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If you want some more free time on your hands, and you have two spare weeks, give this a go.

The idea here is that you fit a 26 hour schedule into a 24 hour day. Basically, you sleep for 8-10 hours at a time, and remain awake for 18-16 hours before going back to bed again.

So... On the first day, you go to sleep at 12AM, and wake up at 8-10AM. You then go to sleep again at 2AM then 26 hours later at 4AM, then 26 hours later at 6AM, 8AM, 10AM, and so forth. After twelve days, you will end up with another 12AM bedtime, giving you two days to adjust back to your original schedule.

If one is completing an ambitious project, this method allows an extra two hours per day to work.

WordUp, Apr 25 2004

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       //The idea here is that you fit a 26 hour schedule into a 24 hour day//

Eh? This doesn't make sense.
ldischler, Apr 25 2004
  

       I want 2 extra hours of sleep - zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
po, Apr 25 2004
  

       You don't gain 2 extra hours. You're just splitting one day up over 12 others. Same amount of time has passed.   

       After 13 days has passed, you'll still have 13 days worth of work done, so there's no point in fucking up your sleep patterns for this.
waugsqueke, Apr 25 2004
  

       I bake this myself every few months... And there is a benefit.   

       But that is [Not widely known] therefore no marking for deletion is required.   

       Normally I am quite happy in the 24hr cycle that the world provides us with.   

       However when I need to finish a project I go into manic 'I have not done the required work yet' mode, and work all hours. One requirement of the following is that when I do get into the working zone I prefer to maintain it as long as possible.   

       Assuming I remain on a 24hr pattern (which I never have in this sort of scenario) I would get up, have breakfast, etc for 1hr. This would be followed by 14hrs work, which, okay includes the odd brew up. Once the 14 hrs are past there is 1hr for supper and relaxation (helped by a supper that can be thrown into the oven without much preparation allowing a return to work whilst it cooks. Then 8 hours in bed completing the cycle.   

       I find this does not suit me.   

       I opt for the following.   

       10hrs in bed, followed by 1 hr getting up / eating breakfast / etc. Then 18hrs work followed by the same 1hr relax and eating in the evening, giving a 30hr cycle.   

       I must admit that only the most desperate of projects requires this kind of draconian chaining to the drawing board, but over 5 'days' i.e. 24 hr cycles, living the 30 hour cycle is 4 'days' but provides an additional 2 hours work. I realise the difference in hours for working is not that great but when I am in a situation where these measures are required, I have found the 30hr cycle easier to maintain.   

       The only problem is when to buy bread and milk...
afrocelt, Apr 25 2004
  

       Great for the self-employed. No so for those in the corporate world.
RayfordSteele, Apr 25 2004
  

       I have in the past worked fourty four out of fourty eight hours.Twenty two hours straight, two hours sleep, then another twenty two hours. Of course you need almost an entire days sleep after this kind of abuse, but the fourty hour work week plus four hours overtime done in two days and then a four day weekend almost makes it worth it.   
      
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