Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
"It would work, if you can find alternatives to each of the steps involved in this process."

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                                           

Compression tents for mountain climbers

Tougher tents that can be pressurized
  (+4)
(+4)
  [vote for,
against]

Mountain sickness might be ameliorated by pressurizing the tents used- this would involve making them airtight, and having some kind of air compressor. A way to replace oxygen could involve an "air change" as needed- the compressor could warm the air used for the replacement. The amount of pressure cold be adjustable (like the softness of some beds I have seen advertised). After all, some mountain climbers would not enjoy it if it were not uncomfortable. Another enhancement for climbers would be a large PULLEY at the top- by connecting a long rope to this pulley, the folks coming down could pull up those who were ascending. Obviously they would need to change direction on alternate days- or tie the rope into a loop? The loop could have embedded wire used for communication and some sort of PA system to let ascenders know the latest news. This would mean fewer Sherpas needed to carry me? until a chair lift could be installed. To those who feel these enhancements violate the "spirit" of mountain ascending - please note that I am not suggesting that anyone be forced to use them - no more than anyone is now forced to hire natives to do all the hard work.
lewstanley, May 30 2016

Gamow Bag http://www.climbing.../the-gamow-bag.html
[MisterQED, Jun 10 2016]

Magnus effect https://en.wikipedi.../wiki/Magnus_effect
Under-utilized [8th of 7, Jun 13 2016]

Here's a pretty old idea along these lines. Supercharger_20For_20Mountain_20Climbers
[doctorremulac3, Jun 13 2016]

[link]






       Better to keep the tent at ambient pressure and use a zeolite-based PSA oxygen concentrator.   

       Of course, they're heavy and require mains electrical power. But don't let that bother you, it's only a matter of dragging several hundred kilos of equipment and a steel-wire armoured cable several thousand metres up a sheer, icy rock face   

       Let us know how that works out for you.
8th of 7, May 30 2016
  

       Ackshully, a bit of quick math and those machines produce 10x more oxygen than a person (at rest, mind) needs. So, with the addition of a CO2 scrubber, a considerably smaller unit should suffice.
FlyingToaster, May 30 2016
  

       This scheme would be great for people who wanted to make the climbing experience more in tents.
bungston, Jun 01 2016
  

       Mechanic's misread:   

       Compression tests for mountain climbers
normzone, Jun 01 2016
  

       Baked long ago.
Steamboat, Jun 01 2016
  

       Cite your source, [Steam].
8th of 7, Jun 01 2016
  

       He's probably thinking of the foot pump model.
normzone, Jun 05 2016
  

       Yep, [QED]'s link appears to refer to a fully baked-in- the-bag commercial version of this.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 10 2016
  

       The idea could be developed into a useful system for mountain rescue.   

       It's wise for hikers and mountaineers to carry a "bivvy bag" - a thick plastic bag intended to provide emergency windproof and waterproof shelter.   

       For rescue teams, it would be useful to be able to carry something a bit mre effective.   

       The answer would be a sort of cylindrical single-use Zorb; made of heavy gauge plastic sheet, in a dual interleaved layer design, it would protect a victim from wind and rain, and most importantly efficiently insulate the occupant from both the air and contact from the ground. Inflated with a simple hand or foot pump, or a CO2 cartridge, it would quickly provide emergency protection.   

       Think of it as several thin airbeds, layered and rolled into a tube.   

       A hypothermic victim could be placed - bivvy bag and all - inside the device, allowing them to conserve body heat.   

       If an efficient seal were provided for the "lid", the occupant would soon suffocate.
8th of 7, Jun 10 2016
  

       I wonder how big a zorb would have to be such that terminal velocity with an occupant inside would not damage the occupant on impact with the ground. Such a zorb could be used for descent, because ascent uses up all the challenge and fun.
bungston, Jun 10 2016
  

       Very approximately, a 6 metre diameter sphere with a total mass 100kg would have a terminal velocity of about 4 m/s, equvalent to a fall of two metres. Given the cushioning effect of the air-filled double wall, that's easily survivable, unless you already have serious injuries; even then, it might only be excruciatingly painful.
8th of 7, Jun 10 2016
  

       8/7 - Very approximately, a 6 metre diameter sphere with a total mass 100kg would have a terminal velocity of about 4 m/s, equvalent to a fall of two metres. Given the cushioning effect of the air-filled double wall, that's easily survivable, unless you already have serious injuries; even then, it might only be excruciatingly painful.   

       If this is accurate then this sounds like a great idea for paratroopers, like Mars lander tech here on Earth.
MisterQED, Jun 13 2016
  

       //sounds like a great idea for paratroopers//   

       Not really. Once the sphere is inflated (or if you exit the aircraft with it already inflated), you have no directional control. In contrast, a square 'chute is effectively a personal glider with a fairly decent glide slope and high manoeuverability.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 13 2016
  

       Clearly what's needed is the zorb plus a catapult to assure your climber doesn't get hung up on the mountain on the way down. For greater flinging capacity the zorb need not be inflated until the person to be conveyed is some distance away.
Voice, Jun 13 2016
  

       ... thus ensuring that apart from their injuries and any other medical issues, they are also in serious need of a shower and a change of underwear.
8th of 7, Jun 13 2016
  

       /Once the sphere is inflated (or if you exit the aircraft with it already inflated), you have no directional control/   

       It should be possible to control the ball by putting English on it. People can roll about in zorbs by walking up the inner circle, causing the outer to roll. In freefall, it should be possible to rapidly spin the relatively light outer sphere with a motor which pushes off against the comparative massive inner sphere (with rider), thus changing the trajectory of the slowly falling zorb.
bungston, Jun 13 2016
  

       The Magnus effect <link> will certainly deliver steering impulse, but will demand a sophisticated inertial guidance platform, fast-acting drives, and an energy source. Keeping the core level while rotating the outer shell, where both are composed of thin, flexible material, is non-trivial.
8th of 7, Jun 13 2016
  

       /an energy source/   

       Got your energy source right here: a windmill. When a thing is falling it experiences a lot of wind, and tapping that wind for energy would slow the fall even more, which would be good. A problem is that making the zorb a toroid with a windmill in the center would displace the rider, who presumably would be safest in the center. Maybe they can learn to get along?   

       /sophisticated hoo-haw/ There will be a driver instead. If something is going too much one way, the driver will go the other way until the too much is cancelled out, then back off on the other way part.
bungston, Jun 14 2016
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle