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Core War Net

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Core war is a game where multiple programs fight to dominate the memory space. It consist of a custom virtual machine, with its own assembly language to allow balanced strategies.

What would be interesting, is if there is a COREWAR like game, but instead of programs seeking to dominate a computer's memory space, a program seek to dominate an entire network of virtualized computers.

There would need to be a mechanism to prevent programs from simply highjacking the next computer and shutting it down to secure the node from competitors. E.g. maybe certain critical subsystems are monitored by an an anti- virus? Or have certain objectives that requires the network port to remain open (e.g. shipping stolen bitcoins to home base)?

Other ideas for this game, could involve specific missions, e.g. beat other programs in stealing unsecured bitcoin wallets. Control the biggest amount of botnet and smash the other command centre server (which jumps IP, and thus requires the other opponent program to be updated on the current IP address by it's own command centre). Infiltrate a factory control network and destroy stuff.

Unlike "hacking games" like uplink, you are only allowed one shot at coding, and releasing it into the wild.

Inspiration: How virus writers and spyware writers, sometimes write codes to attack other viruses so that they can more fully control a network.

mofosyne, Jun 07 2014

Core War: Two Programs Enter, One Program Leaves http://blog.codingh...one-program-leaves/
FROM: CODING HORROR programming and human factors [mofosyne, Jun 07 2014]

wikipedia CoreWar http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Core_War
Core War is a programming game created by D. G. Jones and A. K. Dewdney in which two or more battle programs (called "warriors") compete for control of a virtual computer. These battle programs are written in an abstract assembly language called Redcode. [mofosyne, Jun 07 2014]

Web Ring for core war stuff http://vyznev.net/corewar/impring/
[mofosyne, Jun 07 2014]

xkcd’s Virus Aquarium Made Real http://hackaday.com...aquarium-made-real/
Looks like its about baked in some sense thanks to XKCD again! [mofosyne, Jun 29 2014]

Virus Aquarium in practice http://wecan.hasthe.technology/
[mofosyne, Jun 29 2014]

[link]






       Pretty rareified bunch that could play this game. And I am not sure what you would watch. Would you just upload your code and then get a line back: "You took it over. Good job." Or "The core repelled your attempts. Try again." Because if you are in the market for a game like that, I think I can write it for you.
bungston, Jun 10 2014
  

       Good idea. Make it so that you can upload a contender and have it run automagically against the top 10 programs for each "scenario".
mofosyne, Jun 10 2014
  

       Could this be done by extending Core Wars to simulate a network (on one machine)? Instead of one fixed memory space, have several with rules about how programs can communicate between them. Wait, is that already the idea? I'm having reading comprehension issues today.
the porpoise, Jun 10 2014
  

       I think so. Otherwise, you would have to simulate an entire OS stack, which would make killer programs a lot more harder to code. Basically as close to bare metal as possible, while somehow still allowing for networking.   

       (How realistic would having a simulated network of linux computer be? And can you make an effective gameplay out of it? Corewar instruction set is designed to allow for multiple approaches. e.g. scanning strikes vs random bombing)
mofosyne, Jun 10 2014
  

       Just noticed that another of XKCD's comic was made into reality! (XKCD Comic 350, “Network” ), while its not a 'competition' network, the concept of "virus aquarium" can be easily extended to this idea.   

       So, this is 80% baked now. All hail XKCD :D , and who ever coded wecan.hasthe.technology
mofosyne, Jun 29 2014
  
      
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