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FAA approved pocket tool

Designed to be safe and easily verified
  (+11, -1)(+11, -1)
(+11, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

I hate the idea of having my best pocket tool consfiscated at the airport or some other security checkpoint. Travelling with it in a suitcase that might be lost or can't be opened is also undesirable.

So have the FAA design a "flight-legal" pocket tool [probably no blade] and sell it for security revenue. The device could even have anti-forgery technology to weed out illegal clones.

You never know when you'll have a Macgywer moment on the plane, in the stadium, inside a federal building.

The reason I'd have the FAA design/implement/subcontract it is because without some skin in the game they'd simply veto all thirdparty tools.

zardoz, Feb 14 2002

(?) Swiss-tec tool with no knife. http://www.tannerss...nt.com/swiss-te.htm
Swiss-tec tool with no knife. [SunTzu, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

(?) Things you can and can't take on a plane http://www.michaelm...chapters/part01.php
[friendlyfire, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

TSA approved multi tool https://www.vat19.c...et-ninja-multi-tool
[sdk16420, Sep 25 2014]

[link]






       Sadly, I think anything that you might find on a pocket tool could be used as a weapon.
dana_renay, Feb 14 2002
  

       I haven't a clue about feasibility on this one, but I am impressed by the thinking behind it. Croissant, zardoz.
quarterbaker, Feb 14 2002
  

       I'll give you a positive vote, too, Zardoz...But do remember, the FAA isn't in the product design, manufacturing or distribution business, and really doesn't care if you are inconvenienced, so long as your flight was safe and timely. I think it's up to you or your designee to come up with a tool that the FAA will find acceptable.
jurist, Feb 15 2002
  

       What jurist says.
bristolz, Feb 15 2002
  

       How about having someone in charge of security who realizes that a box-cutter can only be used as a weapon against those who are willing to have it used against them; after 9/11, nobody will be so willing.
supercat, Feb 15 2002
  

       I think were down to a soft rubber spatula, and perhaps a six inch bit of twine...
landsknechte, Feb 15 2002
  

       Having once been stabbed with a pencil, I can't imagine the chances of removing all weapons from aircraft is even vaguely feasible. As a pilot, I have a different take on the matter - ALL adult passengers should be issued with really sharp knives. On an average flight of 200 people, if we are really unlucky, there will be just one or two undesirables. The other 198, all armed, should be able to deal with them....
drew, Feb 15 2002
  

       Even the all purpose hook? I guess I could imagine it as a weapon, but it's so useless normally....
cpt kangarooski, Feb 16 2002
  

       Check out the link. All weapons were band in high school, So I carried this. Now I realize, schools and airplanes have far different security and this could be used as a weapon but so can anything. They could strangle people with the in-flight movie headphones, but there not wireless yet.   

       So I guess you would just have to ask if it was ok to carry.
SunTzu, Apr 10 2003
  

       [supercat] is right - and makes me wonder whether since Sept 11 2001 anyone has been brave enough to hijack an aeroplane. Anyone know?
hippo, Apr 10 2003
  

       Any handheld tool with any functionality can be used as a weapon. I suggest you bring a wooden clothespin.
snarfyguy, Apr 10 2003
  

       An FAA approved pocket tool... Like, maybe a rubber duck in a cardboard box? No, you could conceal a bomb in the duck. A pocket spoon? No, you could sharpen it. A quarter with a hole in it? That could fly, but since there aren't any vending machines on airplanes, it wouldn't be of much use. The best I can think of is a peice of paper. You know, for writing things on. If they let you bring a pencil.
wittywastrel, May 19 2003
  

       FAA approved? That'll be a lighter then (see link).
friendlyfire, May 19 2003
  

       I have to agree with Rods Tiger...I think you could do a lot more damage with a couple of No.2 pencils and a shoelace than with a toenail clipper.
melvin_j, May 19 2003
  

       You could have the FAA give ratings to existing products in terms of the number of functions/tools not present.
scubadooper, May 19 2003
  
      
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