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Great pyramid quote

From large buiding corp
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Somehow we trick a large building company into giving us an estimate for the cost of building a copy of the great pyramid of giza in Las Vegas.

It must be a detailed description of how they plan to do it with cost per item.

Just to compare this with the theories we have about how the pyramid was built.

If the quote is of good quality this might lead to some interesting new insight or discussion at least.

zeno, Sep 27 2014

Replica Great Monuments http://www.dailymai...hal-stay-night.html
[bs0u0155, Sep 30 2014]

Geopolymer Pyramids http://www.geopolym...rchaeology/pyramids
The theory that the pyramids were build with artrificial geopolymer stones. [scad mientist, Sep 30 2014]

The simple way https://www.youtube...watch?v=RRf7BXIGKpg
[pashute, Sep 30 2014]

He did it hiiiiis way http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_Castle
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Sep 30 2014]

JUNE 1999 CIVIL ENGINEERING MAGAZINE http://www.abovetop...5573/pg2#pid2657889
Analysis by construction management firm Daniel, Mann, Johnson, & Mendenhall (DMJM) [the porpoise, Sep 30 2014]

Copper mirrors http://www.armlaser...o2-laser-p-339.html
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Oct 03 2014]

Focus. https://www.youtube...watch?v=z0_nuvPKIi8
1:20 mark [2 fries shy of a happy meal, Oct 04 2014]

[link]






       "Wheatsheaf, feather, feather, wiggly line, big eye, ibis, boat, man with staff, big eye, cow, jackal with wheelbarrow …"
8th of 7, Sep 27 2014
  

       This is, if I may be permitted to say so, brilliant.   

       I don't think you'd need to trick the company (or could). Just ask two big companies to quote and make it into a television program. Each company would have to get to grips with what's known about the Giza pyramid, and then find the most effective way to reproduce it using modern equipment (but traditional materials). Winner is the company with the lowest-cost workable plan.   

       I think it would be brilliant. You could have a whole TV series - the pyramids, Stonehenge...   

       [To paraphrase an old joke "So, you want a regular building but you want no doors, no windows, no plumbing, no electrics and no drainage? Normally I'd do it for $250M, but with all those extra requirements..."]
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 27 2014
  

       Somehow we trick = tv show   

       I knew someone would think of something.   

       I'd also like to see one of those shows on the golden gate bridge. Cost comparison, efficiency comparison, metalurgy comparison. I don't suppose any of the people involved are still alive but we could interview a grandchild for the human interest angle.   

       This could be a great project for students of architecture.   

       Naturally there would be an accompanying website where people could join in polite discourse.
zeno, Sep 27 2014
  

       One of the bids would have to include use of Manuel labor. And we could have a referendum on whose tomb it becomes.
cudgel, Sep 27 2014
  

       While we're at it, can we get a replica of the Eiffel Tower?
theircompetitor, Sep 27 2014
  

       We've already got one. We put it in Blackpool where it won't bother people.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 27 2014
  

       I'm not sure I get the point? A 70 ton tower crane, a very large order of stone from a quarry, and you're done in about 6 months with maybe a few dozen people involved.   

       Unless you're specifically asking for it to be done without modern equipment, in which case, good luck finding a company to quote it.
MechE, Sep 27 2014
  

       Pity Manuel. He always seems to get stuck with the hardest jobs.
RayfordSteele, Sep 28 2014
  

       No it IS about doing it with modern equipment. I think meche is not seeing all the complications.   

       To illustrate: 2.5 million stone blocks in six months is one block every 7 seconds. I don't see us doing it in under ten years.
zeno, Sep 30 2014
  

       Great link!
zeno, Sep 30 2014
  

       //While we're at it, can we get a replica of the Eiffel Tower//   

       Check out Dubailand <link> my brother is/was peripherally involved with it. The Eiffel Tower was planned to be 1.1:1. As in slightly bigger than the original. Apparently it's pretty easy to build such a structure nowadays, the difficulty comes in getting the rivets to look right, and modern high grade steel would look a little thin. Sorry for linking to the Daily Mail btw.
bs0u0155, Sep 30 2014
  

       //I don't think you'd need to trick the company//   

       //(reality show concept)//   

       Was just going to type both of those ideas myself. The company would get great publicity and it would top the charts of reality shows if somebody actually managed to fund it somehow.   

       What would the tourist income be for a desert community that had an exact copy of the great pyramid made out of the same materials? Enough to justify the expense of building it? How much would it cost? How long to get return on the investment? These are all pretty interesting questions that a reality show could look into.   

       Again, for the construction company that won the contract, you think their name would be on the map much? "Remulac Construction. Can we build that? Yea, we can build that." (tm) Talk about flipping the bird to ancient construction techniques. An insult from across the ages.   

       Awesome. [+]
doctorremulac3, Sep 30 2014
  

       //To illustrate: 2.5 million stone blocks in six months is one block every 7 seconds. I don't see us doing it in under ten years.//   

       So maybe you need 4 tower cranes and a rail spur.   

       No mortar. No delay after setting. I may have been exaggerating at 6 months, but it's simply not a huge or complex deal. And I bet you could manage one block placement every 30 seconds.   

       And as a reality show it would be incredibly boring. Pick stone block off truck or rail car. Swing over to the pyramid. Place, spending a bit of time making sure of the placement.   

       Repeat. A lot.
MechE, Sep 30 2014
  

       //would top the charts of reality shows //   

       Nah. The more a reality show is interesting to.... er.. people like us.. i.e. it has some engineering in it, the worse it does. I found the special edition of Scrapheap Challenge, where they made v.early British, French and American aircraft using period tools, absolutely fascinating. Care to guess how that did in the ratings vs the series of Big Brother in the same year? Let alone the global syndication. For another example.. look at "The Colony" build a radio from scratch? Get cancelled at season 2. Have people engaged in meaningless drama like socially mobile chimps, er... I mean human interest.... get global syndication and bajillions of viewers.   

       Excuse me while I go and have a serious think about this whole civilization thing.
bs0u0155, Sep 30 2014
  

       Well, Mythbusters is a hit.   

       But then again so is "Here Comes Honey BooBoo" which, correct me if I'm wrong, is featured on the Learning Channel.
doctorremulac3, Sep 30 2014
  

       //I may have been exaggerating at 6 months//   

       Poured concrete over rebar would be WAY faster. Stronger too. Shame it would be a little inauthentic. Maybe the losing contractor gets to do it the modern way?
bs0u0155, Sep 30 2014
  

       Somewhere in the television wasteland I saw a piece some years ago where a team went to Egypt, hired street labor and built a scale protoype about 12 feet tall using 2' cube rocks. Just rope, logs, levers, etc. They really got into it and the technical arguments, labor arrangements, et all were pretty entertaining.
normzone, Sep 30 2014
  

       // Poured concrete over rebar would be WAY faster. Stronger too. Shame it would be a little inauthentic. //   

       Well, depending who you ask, it may be more authentic than placing stone blocks. See link on Geopolymer Pyramids
scad mientist, Sep 30 2014
  

       Would this building need to be the same materials as the pyramid? Or just the same size and shape? All that cut stone will be expensive.   

       I was impressed on visiting one of those cathedrals in England (they have loads!) that people were working on it. Fixing stuff up, buffing the gargoyles etc. It makes sense - the place has been in constant use. Not sure about the pyramids but lots of people count on the tourist dollars their ruins bring in, and so are motivated to not have them get ruined beyond recognition. So there must be a body of knowledge as regards working with antique structures.
bungston, Sep 30 2014
  

       //Somewhere in the television wasteland I saw a piece some years ago where a team went to Egypt, hired street labor and built a scale protoype about 12 feet tall using 2' cube rocks.//   

       That rings a bell. Was there an English or American engineer working with an Egyptian engineer arguing back and forth about how to best do it?   

       Think I saw that too.
doctorremulac3, Sep 30 2014
  

       It'd be easier to just make this a test for promotion within a company like Bechtel. Kind of like a thesis for PhD's, but for mid-level project managers seeking to climb the corp's ladder.   

       No bidder would take it seriously. Yes, Vegas is insane, but for that construction cost, you'd need a bit more occupancy than just those tiny few tunnels.   

       So, it must be understood by all to be an academic or entertainment exercise. And, sorry, but the audience for reality TV likes drama queens & oafs. It doesn't like calculations and engineering as much.   

       If you want to see the results, ask Bechtel to publicize/blog/video the results of each year's internal promotion challenge, and they'd pick a new monument each year.
sophocles, Sep 30 2014
  

       While everybody (including myself) who hasn't seen one imagines pyramid blocks as being rather large (like 8x8x16' or something), most are less than a cubic metre. With everything set up, you could probably do construction in a year or so, even that "6 months" isn't totally unreasonable, given enough cranes. I think the hard part (timewise) would be getting that many blocks cut from quarries.
FlyingToaster, Sep 30 2014
  

       //I think the hard part (timewise) would be getting that many blocks cut from quarries.//   

       I remember seeing a program where they said that the workment got them out by *wearing away the surrounding stone* by bashing it with a smaller rock. So each one took months and months.
I still don't quite believe it.
Loris, Sep 30 2014
  

       I've never seen an adequate explanation of how the multitude of workers were kept fed during construction. Seems like a huge fleet of roach coaches would be needed.
cudgel, Sep 30 2014
  

       Quick, someone channel Edward Leedskalnin!   

       //they said that the workment got them out by *wearing away the surrounding stone* by bashing it with a smaller rock.//   

       Sounds unlikely.   

       One method (not sure if it was used for the pyramids) was to drill a line of holes using a hammer and chisel, then hammer dry wooden pegs into the holes. The pegs were then soaked in water, causing them to expand and splitting the rock.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 30 2014
  

       Given that everyone is expressing awe at human technological ingenuity on globally networked electronic devices I'm going to go against the grain and say the pyramids aren't really that impressive at all. After all what are they supposed to be, a simulacra of a mountain, pile of rocks that already exists to no purposeful end? Certainly I've seen the Rocky Mountains (many are pyramidal shaped) and they do inspire awe, but I'm not going to confuse that awe with technological awe. In fact, if the purpose of the pyramids were actually to cause people to be struck dumb with awe, then I'm very much against this kind of speculation. I'll even go way overboard and say that this was early industrial psychology, which I oppose as an unindustrious psychologicaly abnormal person. To reinforce this claim I'll direct your attention to standard Discovery Channel programming that combines work ethic TV shows, and feats of engineering shows that correspond to the regime that I refer.
rcarty, Sep 30 2014
  

       [rcarty]: Yep. When people say, "OMG! ALIENS?! How can South America & Africa have ancient cultures that built similar (pyramid) structures?" I think: Well, the most stable structure is a pile.   

       Build a tall tower? In a few years, after war, fire, you have a pile. Straighten it a bit to the sun lines, & it's a nice pyramid.   

       Want to impress the tribe with your EVEN BIGGER pyramid? Just add a layer to the existing pile/pyramid.   

       Want to actually put anything in it? Well, that's just like mining tunnels. Nothing fancy or structural besides a few holes & walls.   

       Want to get it hollow like the Vegas Luxor? Nope. That's far beyond the ancients.
sophocles, Sep 30 2014
  

       It looks like the "pounding with other rocks" thing was pretty much limited to the few granite blocks in the pyramids.   

       The main construction of limestone was worked with copper tools. Chisels, saws, etc. The evidence is that they work fine as long as you have a set or two out being sharpened while you're working with the other one.
MechE, Sep 30 2014
  

       Sounds like modern machine shop tool room practices.
normzone, Sep 30 2014
  

       //Want to get it hollow like the Vegas Luxor? Nope. That's far beyond the ancients// Beyond the moderns too, I imagine. A cubic metre of granite is a tad on the heavy side. Trying to make a hollow pyramid, even with supporting columns, out of granite blocks would be a difficult task.
FlyingToaster, Sep 30 2014
  

       This has been done [link], they just didn't stage it as a quote.   

       An improvement would be to put it out for tender and invite multiple companies to compete for the "work". You'll get different approaches and perhaps competition will elicit original ideas. The prize will be the publicity for those with the better ideas and lowest quotes.
the porpoise, Sep 30 2014
  

       //say the pyramids aren't really that impressive at all.   

       Agreed, look pretty from a distance, but then no idea of scale, close up it's just like standing next to a wall, can't even tell if it's vertical or at an angle.
not_morrison_rm, Sep 30 2014
  

       ////they said that the workment got them out by *wearing away the surrounding stone* by bashing it with a smaller rock.////   

       //Sounds unlikely.//   

       Absolutely - but having watched pashute's link ("The simple way" - strange video, has a strange vaguely racist start and end... skip to 2 mins 20 secs where it seems to cut to a documentary) it's stated there, with evidence. And the way it's described, that method might have been used only for large decorative granite menhirs (um, obilisks, whatever), not for every block.
Loris, Oct 01 2014
  

       Would you settle for a giant inflatable pyramid?
RayfordSteele, Oct 01 2014
  

       Obviously my previous comment wasn't to disparage an ancient civilization, or a current people's pride in it even though the Arab expansion happened way less than 5000 years ago, but at the same time contemporary industrial achievement is actually a contested quality of cultural superiority or superiority obsessed cultures. For example the enemies of the USA don't acknowledge the technological innovations of the 21st century that largely originated there as the hallmarks of a great civilization. Indeed, in a less favorable appraisal it can be said these developments are the ends of a shared set of values that embody and justify those values through 'undeniability' or truth-power. Much in the same way a North American Indian can point to environmental crisis to justify their set of values that didn't necessitate complete and militantly ordered social organization around the values of technological development reflected in its most naive form as mandatory education and disciplinary systems. Of course the truth-power conflict is ongoing but the undeniability of the the world at the level of materiality produces inherent arguments on a differential continuum of interpretation of the technological object. Basically that's how I read Guy Debord who hypersignified a form of capital with Marxist critiques in his many theses.
rcarty, Oct 01 2014
  

       And we haven't mastered paragraph breaks either.
normzone, Oct 01 2014
  

       Where would the most masterful break have been placed?
rcarty, Oct 01 2014
  

       Between the paragraphs, obviously.
pocmloc, Oct 01 2014
  

       Much in the same way isn't the start of a new paragraph it's reinforcing a point by using a comparison which is really a subthesis and not deserving of an independent thesis. That Debord wrote society of the spectacle as a set of theses rather than as paragraphs is that the object that it refers produces the proof of each thesis, the theses require no internal textual justification. The role of the interpretant is to act as a spectator at the same spectacle ' the object' that the theses relate.
rcarty, Oct 01 2014
  

       Yeah, but paragraph breaks are good.
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 01 2014
  

       ////they said that the workmen got them out by *wearing away the surrounding stone* by bashing it with a smaller rock.////   

       //Sounds unlikely.//   

       That was my thought too
Here's a bit of a stretch;
  

       Would it have been possible, using polished copper parabolic mirrors, to focus sunlight enough to cause the individual substances comprising granite to burst free of their surrounding substances in sequence as this focal point of light changed positions?
On a track system this could act almost like a primitive laser during the day for final shaping, (and did they have glass lenses back then?)
Also, did the temperatures at night never drop below freezing at certain times of the year in ancient Egypt? If so, then quarrying would have been carried out drilling holes, then filling them with water and capping them.
  

       Supports could keep a cliff face from toppling and allow individual already squared blocks of incredible size to be lowered for transport.
The one's that didn't break while lowering would be given to the Artisan guild to be turned into something pretty.
  

       Can you imagine what those pyramids must have looked like all polished up and gleaming?   

       So I'm an alien?   

       If it was up to me, the inflatable pyramid would be lighter than air, run on hot vapor warmed by concentrated sun light.
pashute, Oct 02 2014
  

       Slaves and small rocks are both considerably cheaper than copper.
pocmloc, Oct 02 2014
  

       //That Debord wrote society of the spectacle   

       Ophthalmologists?   

       // did the temperatures at night never drop below freezing at certain times of the year in ancient Egypt?   

       Erm you should be able to do that now, but not in the winter as it gets a bit cloudy, which would prevent IR being emitted into space
not_morrison_rm, Oct 02 2014
  

       [rcarty], is there a 'For Dummies' guide to reading what you write?   

       //Would it have been possible, using polished copper parabolic mirrors, to focus sunlight enough to cause the individual substances comprising granite to burst free of their surrounding substances in sequence as this focal point of light changed positions?//   

       In a word, no.
RayfordSteele, Oct 02 2014
  

       // I'd also like to see one of those shows on the golden gate bridge. Cost comparison, efficiency comparison, metalurgy comparison. //   

       I've skipped most of the annos, so forgive me if somebody's mentioned this, but if 'we' start publishing metallurgy studies on old structures like the Golden Gate Bridge people will go apeshit. The USA's artery infrastructure is in critical disrepair, and the bridges are the worst. If the public knew how many microfissures and fatigue points are present in the steel of these old bridges there would be a huge, expensive surge of uneducated public outrage.   

       An architect who wasn't/isn't famous enough for me to remember his name once said (something like) "No bridge lasts forever; as soon as you put one up it begins the slow process of falling down."
Alterother, Oct 02 2014
  

       ////Would it have been possible, using polished copper parabolic mirrors, to focus sunlight enough to cause the individual substances comprising granite to burst free of their surrounding substances in sequence as this focal point of light changed positions?//   

       In a word, no.//   

       hmmm, after a bit of research I have to disagree. A polished copper mirror can have 98% reflection. [1st link]
A small-ish parabolic mirror can reach thousands of degrees and melt rock, [2nd link] so I see no reason that this technique could not have been used to shape granite.
  

       Because that polished copper mirror involves metallurgy and polishing techniques that didn't exist 20 years ago, let alone 5000.   

       Ditto the techniques for producing a highly accurate parabolic mirror.   

       To say nothing of the fact that copper focuses 98% of the light in a limited wavelength band, so it won't reach the temperature a broader mirror would.   

       And finally, there is no evidence of melted rock either in the build or at the quarries.   

       To summarize: No.
MechE, Oct 03 2014
  

       //I think that goes for how India can deliver space projects cheaper.//   

       There's also the fact that it weighed considerably less and had a lot fewer delicate scientific instruments that had to be ruggedized to survive launch forces.
MechE, Oct 03 2014
  

       //To summarize: No.//   

       Too bad. It would have been cool.
Two of those three points could be accounted for though. There was the ability to polish small flat copper mirrors. A near perfect parabola could be achieved by nothing more advanced than placing small flat mirrors on a horizontally suspended stretched hide, their weight alone would create the shape.
No evidence of melted rock is a pretty good sign against it though.
  

       hmm   

       //[rcarty], is there a 'For Dummies' guide to reading what you write? //   

       Don't worry, [RayfordSteele], it's not you. [rcarty]'s writing is gratuitously badly punctuated and badly worded. Its subject matter is sometimes genuinely complex, but there's a rather affected layer of obfuscation on top of that. See XKCD 169.   

       If you're still curious, you could start with Jacques Derrida's paper "Differance", published in 1968. That's probably the locus classicus for the style which [rcarty] pastiches - and the agenda which that style embodies.   

       The style was genuinely clever, albeit nasty, when Derrida pioneered it. From his epigoni, though, it has become lame and boring.
pertinax, Oct 04 2014
  

       I've got a few for your consideration - tbh, they're not that inspirational.   

       "Ich bin einer Gizani", or
"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at a pyramid"
"Life is like a pyramid of chocolate - i.e. a conic solid with a polyhedral base, only made out of chocolate."
zen_tom, Oct 06 2014
  

       //There was the ability to polish small flat copper mirrors.//   

       Not to 98% reflective.   

       //A near perfect parabola could be achieved by nothing more advanced than placing small flat mirrors on a horizontally suspended stretched hide, their weight alone would create the shape.//   

       A catenary and a parabola are not (quite) identical, and for the sort of focusing you are talking about, they really need to be. There's also the issue that you only get a catenary if your span is horizontal, and that wouldn't leave you with the ability to aim the focal point.
MechE, Oct 06 2014
  

       Yes, but you could put a second, aimable mirror at the focus, shirley ?
8th of 7, Oct 06 2014
  

       //flat copper mirrors.//
Not to 98% reflective.//
  

       Ok so what temp would 50% reflectivity at those wavelengths reach?   

       //you only get a catenary if your span is horizontal, and that wouldn't leave you with the ability to aim the focal point.//   

       Thank you for introducing me to the word catenary! (I had no idea) Are you sure though that the weight of resting objects on a level flat plane create a catenary rather than a parabola?... and would different shaped mirrors, (say triangular or round) create different curves?   

       As for aiming the stretched hide, enough wattle and daub applied to the underside baking in the sun would set that shape rather solidly for tilting or using as a mold to create duplicates.   

       Also, could a round spinning mold not be used to create a parabola from liquid metal which cooled while spinning... heck even drying mud would work and could then be gilded?
How perfect a parabolic mirror would a spinning tray of mercury create?
Did ancient Egyptians have access to mercury?
  

       So many questions...   

       To the Internet!   
      
[annotate]
  


 

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