Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Halfbakery 101

Writing workshops
  (+1, -4)
(+1, -4)
  [vote for,
against]

Having absorbed the halfbakery culture over the past few years, it seems to me that a fundemental part of an idea is how it's presented.

I've read crap ideas that have well been over-bunned, albeit these were written by literacy geniuses, but sadly they were terrible, terrible ideas. For various reasons I shan't link any of said terrible ideas, as I feel I am already widely disliked in this lovely community. But you guys know who you are, with your all your trickery.

Simmilarly, I have come upon brilliant ideas, that have recieved little bunnage, but not neccesarly fishboned. These are often because the presentation was poor, wording was incorrect, litte (if any) clever puns used, no creative writing by way of imagery, simmilies and all that malarky shown in their writing etc. It is these poor souls that are falling short of a life of [+] signs and croissants.

The most advantageous style of writing is one that is unique to Halfbakery. Pioneered by the 'Dons' of the HB, if you will, by the likes of Jutta, UnaBubba, DrCurry and those dinosaurs.

I propose Halfbakery 101, a writing workshop designed by those who know it the best. an Online tutorial if you will, which teaches one how to be the ultimate idea writer. There would be exams, posted by the students and marked by the Dons, and the grading system would use croissants and fishbones instead of the tired traditional ABCDF.

Depending on the outcome of the voting on this idea, I will decide whether or not I need to take the class myself.

shinobi, Sep 11 2006

101="entry level courses" (in the US) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/101_(number)
[xandram, Sep 11 2006]

[link]






       I'd like to learn some new idea writing styles, because I always end up with the lame [how it is now] [this is an idea for] [here are the details] format.   

       But I honestly don't think the genius writing of the Dons can be taught. I'd love to do what they do - sometimes just writing one great sentence as the whole of the idea, but how can one teach that?
phundug, Sep 11 2006
  

       sounds like you're encouraging conformity and formulaic writing. Seriously, who gives a &^*@ if a crap idea gets lots of buns by appealing to the lowest common denominator.   

       Remember, a good idea is its own reward.
xaviergisz, Sep 11 2006
  

       "The most advantageous style of writing is one that is unique to Halfbakery. Pioneered by the 'Dons' of the HB, if you will, by the likes of Jutta, UnaBubba, DrCurry and those..."   

       The best ideas, as Krelnik once tried to get people to support, were made by first time posters, waltzing through a fun moment of their life.
blissmiss, Sep 11 2006
  

       <scratches 'creative writing' from CV>
po, Sep 11 2006
  

       //I feel I am already widely disliked in this lovely community//   

       I'm not sure what you're worried about [shinobi] your profile page shows you've a good bun/bone ratio (for those who are keeping score)   

       Likewise, I'm not convinced that there is a single winning style to be aped by the masses. Yes there are some stylistic conventions [brackets], *emphasis* and <actions> that some people tend to employ - but they are normally reserved for annotations. Otherwise, I just don't see it.   

       Furthermore, your idea (a writing class where you are graded by HB denizens on a bun/bone rating) sounds exactly like the existing Halfbakery itself.   

       And finally, I want to know what these terrible ideas are you're talking about. What was it about them that was so bad, and by what trickery were they saved? Purely in terms of writing style, and in order to achieve the goals you set out, it ought to be these ideas we should be learning from.   

       Personally, I don't want to see a homogenous writing style across the bakery - I enjoy the diversity immensely.
zen_tom, Sep 11 2006
  

       I stand corrected. I don't really feel unliked here, its just a paranoid dillusion.
shinobi, Sep 11 2006
  

       sp: disliked, delusion. ;o)
DrBob, Sep 11 2006
  

       There, you've earned another lesson, shinobi.   

       My writing style has improved enormously - solely because of the beating my early ideas took - sadly they are not here any more. So - if you think you are disliked, or that your ideas are disliked - learn from it, this is the finishing school for writing. Take advantage of it.   

       I did.
neelandan, Sep 11 2006
  

       I like the idea (in itself) and I love all the annos. I think [BrauBeaton] sums it up nicely though.   

       The "dons" do have great writing style, but that also comes from *who* they are inside and the sum total of all their experiences. That isn't always something that can be really be conveyed through a class.   

       There will be no fishbone or croissant today.
xandram, Sep 11 2006
  

       //crap ideas that have well been over- bunned// , //brilliant ideas, that have recieved little bunnage//   

       What you seem to be saying is that your opinion sometimes differs from that of the majority on whether an idea is good or not. This is normal.
wagster, Sep 11 2006
  

       No it's not.
Ian Tindale, Sep 11 2006
  

       The 'Dons' of the Halfbakery. I like that. I aspire to become one.   

       As for my writing style, I like to think that I've improved the acquired skill. I've learned that when writing something you're inspirational about, you tend to put in more soul.
shinobi, Sep 11 2006
  

       Incidentally, what's the one hundred and one in the title? What is there that there's a hundred and one of? What happened to the first hundred versions of this idea? Or is it that the 'dons' of halfbakery number one hundred and one - in which case, who are these?
Ian Tindale, Sep 11 2006
  

       Guess you didn't take modular classes at university.
DrCurry, Sep 11 2006
  

       No. I taught myself to use a Roland System 700, and my Arp 2600 is sort of 'semi-modular' but came with the original handbook (from the '70s - people with beards on the cover).
Ian Tindale, Sep 11 2006
  

       Every time I think I know the Do's and Don's of the halfbakery, they change.
wagster, Sep 11 2006
  

       There were 101 Dalmatian's.
DrBob, Sep 11 2006
  

       I thought it was room.
po, Sep 11 2006
  

       [crap ideas that have well been over-bunned, albeit these were written by literacy geniuses] ---- [ I shan't link any of said terrible ideas]   

       Darn. I was so hoping that one of my ideas would be on that list.
normzone, Sep 11 2006
  

       //No, No, No. It's normal to to feel emotionally naked after a particularly brutal boning.//

I always feel quite cheerful about such things. But then I've always liked poking sticks into ant's nests too.
DrBob, Sep 11 2006
  

       And you always gone around emotionally naked, after all.
DrCurry, Sep 11 2006
  

       And not just emotionally either.

I know, too much information!
DrBob, Sep 11 2006
  
      
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