Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
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no follow-through.

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Hyper Caps

New caps lock key contains the spirit of capitalism.
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Each one of these Caps Lock keys contain some graphic imagery to remind of some aspect of capitalist thought. These are to remind the user to capitalize at every reasonable opportunity. Not only for those instances within formal rules, but also when it is socially advantageous. One will look like a house, one will have a diving line with right and wrong, one will have an individual person standing, etc. there's so many possible capitalism keys one would have to remind not to give them all away here if it existed already. Unfortunately the idea does not exist, so there is no way to capitalize this idea property. Mine looks like a step and my finger keeps slipping, or diving into the crack.

Bonus: Comes with a wireless baseball cap that pats you on the head for doing something normal. Connected using sign association rather than waves.

rcarty, Dec 15 2014

Actualized! http://www.grownupgeek.com/capslock.jpg
[rcarty, Dec 15 2014]

[link]






       CAPITALISM IS CRUISE CONTROL FOR COOL
sninctown, Dec 15 2014
  

       I don't listen to Hitchens, and he's trying to help you not to, but also reaching for fruits as well.
rcarty, Dec 15 2014
  

       I wonder when German and English diverged as regards profligate capitalization? German capitalizes lots of nouns, both in titles as well as in the middle of sentences. I confirmed this to be true just now on the der Spiegel website.   

       English used to capitalize each noun in the title of an article (I looked at back issues of Nature to confirm this) but no longer does. I am not sure when that change took place. Nature articles from the 1800s do not capitalize every noun within the text but I have a vague memory of reading older English works that did.
bungston, Dec 16 2014
  
      
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