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Prisoner Exchange

Prisoner Exchange
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(+1, -4)
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Are you tired of your hard-earned tax dollars being used to molly coddle and house society's most heinious monsters? How about a prisoner exchange system. The justice systems in wealthiest countries (The U.S, Canada, Britain, France and Germany, The Scandinavian states) would pay third world governments that are known to house prisoners on the cheap with notoriously rough jails to house convicts for the duration of their sentence. Rufus would think twice about pimping and crack dealing on the streets of Los Angeles after spending 5 years in a Chinese or Russian prison. Paedophiles would cringe at the mere thought of laying their hands on another child after being repeatedly sodomized by a smelly 500lb warden in a dank, smelly and filthy Turkish prison. Instead of having to pay tens of thousands of dollars per year to house convicts in luxurious living conditions, the government would pay something like $500 in hard currency per year to the governments housing our convicts.
RogerRam, Sep 27 2002

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       Other than the implications for the US federal appeals system, broad questions of human right violations, international comity (you think our quid pro quo system sucks?), and the unarguable effect that products of prisons tend to mirror the general sentiment of the larger incarcerated group, I think this is a super, super idea!
reensure, Sep 27 2002
  

       I was thinking the same thing [Nick].
kaz, Sep 27 2002
  

       To paraphrase someone clever than I, a society is judged on the way it treats its prisoners.   

       And anyway, if this is a prisoner _exchange_ (as the idea name and subhead state) then surely foreign prisoners will be shipped to the US to sample the apparently luxurious accomodation in San Quentin, Rikers Island etc. So no money is saved. Indeed, more money would be spent, educating the warders so that they might be able to communicate with their new and exotic charges. [What is the Russian for "Ten days in the hole"?]
calum, Sep 28 2002
  

       Actually, in Russsian, pronunciation of "ten days in the hole" is:

d'Esit' dnE'ee v ot'v'erst'ee-eh

"the hole" - approprately enough, sounds like somewhat like "adversity" - though translation back to English is "Ten days in an aperture"

' = emphasis/hard sound
E=eh
thumbwax, Sep 28 2002
  

       //Now you want me to learn Russian too?//
Student = StudEnt
Therefore, you know more Russian than you realize.
thumbwax, Sep 28 2002
  

       What about the innocent people that are found guilty? Their lives are already fucked, why make them worse by sending them to a dungeon in Russia?
DonutBox, Sep 28 2002
  

       On the other hand, if we made the prisons in America more uncomfortable, convicts would definitely think first in the future, but it will never be perfectly balanced.
DonutBox, Sep 28 2002
  

       Look at who runs the prisons now. You may think it's the state but in fact the state and federal gov subcontracts the job to corporations with large foreign ownership interests. This has resulted in a system where foreign owners lobby our gov to lock up more US citizens and enhance their revenue. Do you really want Rwanda lobbying our reps to lock up your kids for any of a number of possible reasons and ship them off to be left to their tender mercies?
Ardd, Sep 29 2002
  

       I find only one problem with this: this would be bad if I got into another arguement with a police officer ^^;. But if someone is found innocent, wouldn't the federal government be forced to compensate them? Plus, this classifies under cruel and unusual punishment.
Shadow777, Feb 28 2003
  
      
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