Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Ask your doctor if the Halfbakery is right for you.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                                                                   

Quornish Pasties

pasties for people not fans of porcine products
  (+4)
(+4)
  [vote for,
against]

Your traditional pastie is aimed mainly at your meat eater. Quorn was developed for people who like the taste/texture of meat, but would rather not extinguish members of the animal kingdom for the sake of a snack.

I propose the people from quorn incorporate their product in the traditional style pastie.

(worth noting that this is obviously distinct from the meat-based products of a similar name from the town of Quorn, SA, Australia)

neilp, Jun 14 2003

Un-American Pot Pie http://www.ivillage...ipe/0,,6322,00.html
[thumbwax, Oct 05 2004]

(?) cornish pasties http://www.hwatson..../cornishpasties.htm
this is the 'real' thing [neilp, Oct 05 2004]

(?) What's Quorn http://www.marlowfoods.com/
The other half of my question. [bristolz, Oct 05 2004]

(?) Bedfordshire clanger http://www.hwatson....ordshireclanger.htm
Half savoury, half sweet. [OnionBread, Oct 05 2004]

(?) Oggie, Oggie, Oggie http://www.foodiesi.../cornishpasties.jsp
"The pasty is a kind of pastry turnover casing, containing meat and vegetables, sometimes with the 'first course' of meat and veg. at one end, and 'second course' of apple at the other" [angel, Oct 05 2004]

[link]






       8th of 7 mentioned once that he'd had Quorn and it was pretty good. However, wiml linked elsewhere with the desciption: A tasty "flesh-like fungus" grown in vats. Has anyone here done a side-by-side comparison of the flesh-like and the flesh? (I'm not describing $1K blow-up dolls vs. nymphos, you filthy animals)
thumbwax, Jun 14 2003
  

       Erm. I had quorn sausages for dinner, and they were rather pleasant. I'm not much fun of the pastie though, but I'm sure those that are deserve to have Quornish ones. PS I'm not vegetarian, but I do know what they put in real sausages
neilp, Jun 14 2003
  

       What's a "pastie" in this context?
bristolz, Jun 14 2003
  

       [bz] - see link
neilp, Jun 14 2003
  

       Thx.
bristolz, Jun 14 2003
  

       [neilp]: Oh. I see. I was wondering how one might get quorn to adhere to one's nipples. Never mind.
Cedar Park, Jun 15 2003
  

       //the taste/texture of meat//
If you can duplicate the taste, texture and color of a British meat pie, count me out.
Amos Kito, Jun 15 2003
  

       You already had quorn on the cob, what's new with this?
kbecker, Jun 15 2003
  

       Pasties, c'mon keep up. ;]   

       Actually (well, in Australia anyhow) a recent study was done into sausages from major supermarkets and a random selection of butchers.   

       They /all/ conformed to Australian standards (which controls things like fat content, how much actual beef, lamb, chicken, pork, whatever, and the amount of preservative in it). If a sausage in Australia says "Beef" you can be sure it's almost entirely proper beef meat (not tripe and dog noses and such)
Freelancer, Jun 15 2003
  

       (a) - <Dubya/>Make no mistake about it</Dubya> kbecker, this pasties idea was posted *before* quorn on the cob (which I posted as a logical conclusion)
thumbwax, Jun 15 2003
  

       Old German proverb: 'You don't need to see how laws and sausages are made.'
ty6, Jun 15 2003
  

       Just dropped in to leave you a fishbone. The pasty (note correct singular spelling) has three of the major food groups - meat, onions and pastry - and only needs the fourth (beer) to become a perfect lunch.
I realise that it was just an excuse for extraneous alliteration, but "porcine" does not enter the picture; pasty meat is skirt or chuck steak.
angel, Jun 16 2003
  

       [angel] *Proper* pasties are actually meat and potato and onion (as anyone in their right mind knows). The cornish kind have other veg in as well though. Has anyone ever had a welsh Oggie?
squeak, Jun 16 2003
  

       what sort of a personal question is that?
po, Jun 16 2003
  

       can I also recommend to you the customer :   

       Quorn Chips Quorned Beef   

       Thats all my quornal knowledge
jonthegeologist, Jun 16 2003
  

       No offence [Po] it's a commestable.
Once whilst in Wales I saw sign
"Hot Welsh Oggies"
  

       So I went in and asked what the hell an Oggie is.
"It's a pasty" I was told and so (being a dedicated follower of pasties) I bought one.
  

       The *Oggie* was about a foot long and was made of inch thick pastry wrapped around an unidentifiable concoction (though I think there was leek in there somewhere).
It took me an hour to eat half of it and then another hour to walk the 10 yards back to my car.
  

       Not an experience I wish to repeat.
squeak, Jun 16 2003
  

       Baked in a building made with Quornwalls.
oneoffdave, Jun 16 2003
  

       [UB]: One would hope the two halves were served separately.
Cedar Park, Jun 16 2003
  

       Actually, they were not. The pasty was developed for the use of tin miners, and consisted of meat and vegetables in one end and, as [UB] suggests, fruit (generally berries or stewed apple) in the other. The pastry was sealed in such a way as to leave a large 'crimp' which was used to hold the pasty, and was discarded, it being filthy with the tin ore waste (or, depending on the individual miner's job, possibly arsenic) from the men's hands.
[squeak]: I cannot claim to be in my right mind, but I am aware that the pasty contains potato and swede. Certain heathens also add carrots, but this is widely frowned upon in Cornwall, as are any other variations from the tradition.
angel, Jun 17 2003
  

       Baked in Galicia, Spain. They call them "empanadas", and are often only filled with "pisto", an Italian-style mix of peppers, tomato and onion. As in Cornwall, they also think they're the only people in the world who make them. (PS- Is "killing" a plant comparable? When you clean the toilet you're killing bacteria...perhaps all life can only exist taking others. I'll leave you with that happy thought.)
git, Jun 17 2003
  

       ... and the Jamaican beef patty, and all the other permutations of the same general idea around the world.   

       But this is pasties, dammit!   

       (never had one; sounds yummy)
snarfyguy, Jun 17 2003
  

       //a 'proper' pasty was filled half with stewed meat and vegetables, and half with fruit pie filling.//   

       Cornish pasties are all meat/veg. The half savoury/half sweet version is a Bedfordshire Clanger (link).
OnionBread, Jun 17 2003
  

       a vertiable quornucopia of annotations. I'm wondering if I should consider a plan for vegetarian street food vendors. Perhaps they could open on intersections.
neilp, Jun 17 2003
  

       and it's only a matter of time before Kellogs get on our case.
neilp, Jun 17 2003
  

       Oh dear - another pun fest. I thought we'd got over them. I thought we'd turned the ...
Jinbish, Jun 17 2003
  

       Cornish Pasty = damned good. Whatever the filling, regional variation, presence or lack of pastry wall and various fruits, they are the best snack money can buy. But, please, don't add quorn.
sambwiches, Jun 17 2003
  

       [OnionBread]: While you're correct regarding the Bedfordshire Clanger, the pasty was originally the same (linky).
angel, Jun 18 2003
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle