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TV-style Graphics program

Picture editing software using a TV-style interface
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Dunno if this has been done - if it has, I haven't seen it. Why doesn't some smart programmer come out with graphics software that uses a "TV" user interface with dials you turn to achieve various effects?

Most people are used to using a TV and adjusting a picture using the dials, right? So why not give them a more familiar method of working with their images? It seems to me that it would be much more user-friendly than the "toolbar" interface most programs use.

mommadillo, Feb 06 2001

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       I like MetaCreations... Ray Dream 3D is a nice program.
Wraith7n, Feb 06 2001
  

       Alas, Kai Krause's UI schemes, while wild to look at, were often not to fun to work with. What was worse was that, by going around the standard UI methods of the operating systems (usually Mac OS) his UI gadgetry often performed abysmally s l o w.
One thing that can work well is an auxilluary panel of hardware shaft encoders--knobs--that change function depending on the context of the program. Some sophisticated CAD programs use them. The advantage is that a user can "dial" two (or more) values at once. Very nice for manipulating things in 3-space and doing things like precision color-correction. Most good (dedicated) broadcast post-production equipment uses shaft encoders hardwired to the software engine allowing multiple settings to be made simultaneously (á la the analog equipment of yore). Can be very efficient. No, really!
bristolz, Feb 06 2001
  

       Who still has dials on their TV?
Krisjohn, May 27 2005
  
      
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