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The Morphing Master Key™

One key that can be programmed for every door and lock that you use!
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If you are anything like me, you probably have multiple responsibilities which come with multiple keys other than what you need for your car, home and office (e.g. the home of a elderly relative, other cars that you drive, gate padlocks, etc.) and sometimes I find myself in situations where I either have to walk around with all of the keys strapped to my belt loop like I am a janitor, or I end up in front of a door or lock that I need to open but I don't have the right set of keys with me.

The Morphing Master Key™ is the solution! Unlike conventional master keying where every lock cylinder has to be changed or set up to accept a master key, the Morphing Master Key™ changes according to the lock that it detects. The Morphing Master Key™ is programmed by scanning the length, cuts, and side flutes on a standard metal key and then associating it with an RFID tag that is discreetly attached to the lock so that the Morphing Master Key™ knows exactly how to emulate the key that it is replacing.

Now you might have some concerns about security. And this is a big issue with conventional master keying because if someone loses a master key, it compromises the security for all of the locks that it is able to open. Well the Morphing Master Key™ has a biometric mechanism on the key itself to determine whether it is being used by an authorized party. If the RFID tag on the lock matches up with the pre-programmed biometric information in the key, then the key will morph into the correct size, type, style, and cut of the key and then it can be used to operate the lock.

If you lose or damage your Morphing Master Key™, that's not problem! The pre-programmed information is already stored on your hard drive or it can be stored at an off-site facility. As soon as you obtain a replacement, simply activate the new key and all of your settings are instantly restored!

And because the settings can also be altered remotely via satellite, if you want to give a Morphing Master Key™ to a baby sitter, neighbor, or a personal assistant, you can issue temporary access to any door that you choose without having to drive across town to meet them in person. If you are on vacation and you would like for your next door neighbor to check on the house without giving them unlimited access, simply program the key from the comfort of your hotel room as soon as you give them a call.

The Morphing Master Key™ also makes a great gift! Get one today!

Jscotty, Jan 04 2010

Brute-force attack on mechanical locks http://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Battering_ram
As per [cowtamer]'s prediction [methinksnot, Jan 07 2010]

[link]






       seems like you have all the scenarios covered.
dentworth, Jan 04 2010
  

       Hang on. This key is physically morphing to become identical to the original?   

       How?
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 04 2010
  

       Surely once you've gone to the trouble of setting up all this RFID, biometric, digital, satellite etc magic, you might as well just omit the morphing mechanism entirely, along with the rest of the conventional mechanical lock, and just use it to open the door directly?   

       Also I take it that all this shiny new digital stuff will not be at all prone to mysterious failures, user confusion and unexpected security vulnerabilities?
Wrongfellow, Jan 04 2010
  

       //you might as well just omit the morphing mechanism entirely, along with the rest of the conventional mechanical lock, and just use it to open the door directly?// The locks remain mechanical completely unaltered making it possible for everyone else carry on as usual. It makes things more convenient for the person with a bunch of keys without inconveniencing everyone else with having to learn and use new technology.   

       //This key is physically morphing to become identical to the original? please explain the morphing mechanism, and how it will be made in such a way that isn't at all heavy or bulky// The key is made up of a space-age metal micromesh that can form into just about any shape within the tolerances of the longest and widest key blank. The size of the key is comparable to that of a late model car key that incorporates the alarm/entry fob into the head of the key and micro-sized actuators inside of the fob-end of the key control the pushing and pulling of the strings inside of the mesh to form the correct shape.
Jscotty, Jan 04 2010
  

       //space-age// You mean 1960s?
pocmloc, Jan 04 2010
  

       // You mean 1960s?// That is correct.
Jscotty, Jan 04 2010
  

       I'm not sure this is mechanically feasible, at least to the degree needed to make a consumer item. You're talking about something that needs to change its shape in three dimensions, to within something like 100 microns, if it's going to do the job.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 04 2010
  

       Actually its geared to specifications in increments of 10 microns.
Jscotty, Jan 06 2010
  

       So, not the morphine master key? Darn.
normzone, Jan 06 2010
  

       The existence of such a device will also make the (already insecure) mechanical key even less secure. With this, it will be possible to mount a brute-force attack on mechanical locks.   

       Bun nonetheless!!
cowtamer, Jan 07 2010
  

       //With this, it will be possible to mount a brute-force attack on mechanical locks.// That's been doable on a standard door lock for ages (google electric lock pick), not to mention anyone willing to learn can pick most of them by hand.   

       Also, not only seems infeasible, but the last thing I want to have to do is change the batteries.   

       //you might as well just omit the morphing mechanism entirely, along with the rest of the conventional mechanical lock, and just use it to open the door directly?// I'll agree with that. Why leave the weak point (mech. lock), with all the advanced security protecting the key?   

       //the RFID tag// If you're going to implement RFID, you might as well just use a proximity fob system. They do make biometrically secured fobs if you wanted them. Some systems do have number of use and time restriction settings for temporary use.   

       As for the remote programming...with the right additions (a PC connected to the lock, with programming software and a web UI comes to mind), programming an extra fob to a system could be done via internet assuming the person already has a fob to use.   

       I'll stay neutral on this for now.
wolstech, Jan 08 2010
  

       //So, not the morphine master key? Darn.// Yes, there is such a thing. It makes you happy about being locked out.. or it might make you believe that you aren't locked out.   

       //If you're going to implement RFID, you might as well just use a proximity fob system. // The RFID tag is just a cheap sticker compared to the expense associated with an active fob system.   

       //Why leave the weak point (mech. lock), with all the advanced security protecting the key?// The purpose of this idea is for convenience for the guy that has too many keys. Not necessarily for the purpose of strengthening the security.
Jscotty, Jan 19 2010
  
      
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