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Trouser Snake

Trouser Snake, a solution for those who don't like ironing.
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The Trouser Snake is a long air filled baloon, which will expand to fit the vessle in which it is. After you have washed your clothes, simply insert your trouser snake into your trousers and inflate. The trousers will then dry without creases! A similar product could be used for shirts too, how about the "shirt lifter"? ;)
not-arf, Jun 26 2004

Siemens is somewhat ahead of you http://www.siemensa...anshirtiron_434.asp
[kbecker, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

[link]






       How well would it dry without air circulating through the material? I'd Buy both though, and make an inflatable dummy to ride with me down the HOV lanes.
ben_krak, Jun 26 2004
  

       I like this idea. +   

       Use a gas permeable balloon envelope that restricts the air enough to keep the fabric taut but which allows airflow to dry the garment. This would require a constant airsource but would allow fabric scents to be applied by adding to the air supply (or things like Febreeze). Using this might allow you to freshen up clothing without a wash.   

       It's also possible that the garment fabric itself would act as the balloon envelope and that you'd have fittings that blocked the leg (or arm and neck) openings and just pump the air supply into the garment.
bristolz, Jun 26 2004
  

       As far as I can tell this is not baked for trousers, probably because some people still expect sharp creases on those. However, check link for the shirt version.
kbecker, Jun 26 2004
  

       In my clothes-drying experience, I can only imagine that being pressed up against a rubber/plastic balloon will cause the pants (I guess we're calling them trousers) to take a long time to dry, much longer than is acceptable. Plus, to extend that time by having to blow up the balloon would be crazy. [-]
Pocketassreturn, Jun 27 2004
  

       [Pocketassreturn] Try reading the anno's above your own.   

       But, but, but... what about my nice creases?
bobad, Jun 27 2004
  

       Maybe you could add a foldover clip to add your creases! I personally am not a huge crease fan. bristolz: I do like your modification idea, some kind of gas permaibility. I was hoping to use warm air anyway ;)
not-arf, Jun 28 2004
  

       [2 fries shy of a happy meal] and [cliff_dood]   

       OK, maybe there is a solution for the drying part of it, but don't you think that's a little too much work just to dry pants? Anyway, where I come from, we used dryers (as in, washer/dryer).
Pocketassreturn, Jun 28 2004
  

       I suggest everyone stops wearing trousers (pants?) and all the fuss about the ironing will go away. Everyone goes to work on their smart shoes and socks and with some nice boxers and that's the end of it. Who's with me? Come one, who will follow me (not too close, please)?
PauloSargaco, Jun 28 2004
  

       I had a completely different mental image when I saw the title, and opened it merely out of morbid curiosity. I was disappointed to find something so mundane. But, I hate ironing my trousers, so (+)
Freefall, Jun 28 2004
  

       Ahh, Freefall, but how could I resist with a title like that!? ;)
not-arf, Jun 29 2004
  

       Very nice. [+]. Can I get mine to look like a gopher with it's eyes bulging outta its head? If you run warm air through it, it could dry out the pockets and seams too.
Letsbuildafort, Jun 29 2004
  

       As I read this idea I was picturing a long, hard growth that appears on command on your thigh...   

       But of course I was wrong. This isn't one of benfrost's, after all.
Eugene, Jun 29 2004
  
      
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