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Wheeluggage

A revolution in luggage design.
  (+11)(+11)
(+11)
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A wheel-shaped suitcase composed of a hard, circular shell with durable canvas sidewalls. The cylindrical shape contains an axle through its center, allowing for attachment of an extendable y-shaped handle so that luggage can be pushed or pulled with ease. The interior of Wheeluggage is separated into zippered compartments, to keep your things more or less as you packed them. If you have more items than fit into the wheel shape, simply unzip Wheeluggage's sidewalls and fold out its extra storage space (thus transforming Wheeluggage into Balluggage).

Pros:
1. Easier to push or pull than traditional block-style luggage.
2. Save $5 each time you might otherwise rent an airport pushcart.

Cons:
1. Not good for carrying items that can't be shaken up.
2. Requires slightly more careful packing of items, to avoid off-balance rotation.
3. Might roll away.

Also available:
* "Bicycle" attachment, connecting two Wheeluggages in-line and allowing a passenger to ride in between.
* Bouncy-balluggage, for the kids.
* "Hitch" attachment for towing behind your car (good idea, [Twizz]!).

swimswim, Jun 22 2009

Like this but for clothes? http://www.metaeffi...-water-carrier.html
A water roller close to the above description. [Aristotle, Jun 23 2009]

Handle-bars like this (thanks [Aristotle]!) http://www.homedepo...fa181a550bf_400.jpg
image of a "lawn roller" -- the handle is similar to Wheeluggages' except that Wheeluggage's doesn't need the cross-bar reinforcement because the handle locks into the axle [swimswim, Jun 23 2009, last modified Jun 26 2009]

[link]






       Why would you fit them into the boot of your car, when you could tow them behind?   

       I like the bicycle idea - perhaps add a motor to one?   

       As a variation of the idea, how about rectangular (21Q friendly) luggage with large diameter inflatable wheels? The luggage space stays upright, the inflatable wheels provide plenty of compliance to rough ground and pack away easily in a pocket on each side of the case. A built in hand pump would complete the system.
Twizz, Jun 23 2009
  

       //wouldn't fit in overhead baggage compartments//
If it was big / heavy enough to need wheels in the first place, it was always going to go in the hold. [+]
coprocephalous, Jun 23 2009
  

       Water carriers have had this same basic design for ages (see link).
Aristotle, Jun 23 2009
  

       [Aristotle]: that's a great picture to illustrate the Wheeluggage concept. The main differences are I that had envisioned Wheeluggage's handle-bar with an additional single bar sticking out from the U-shape, making it into a sort of Y-shape; and that Wheeluggage has expandable canvas side-walls.
swimswim, Jun 23 2009
  

       Sounds like a classic lawn roller handle design.
Aristotle, Jun 23 2009
  

       We're still working out the mechanics of the duffle style. But our marketing department has already decided on "Loggage" as the product name.
swimswim, Jun 24 2009
  

       hmm... might I most humbly suggest a "soft" handle like a rope that goes from one side to the other rather than an aluminium frame.
FlyingToaster, Jun 25 2009
  

       I haven't been able to decide about this, but I keep picturing using it as a baby stroller!! hah!
xandram, Jun 25 2009
  

       //Not good for carrying items that can't be shaken up//   

       An inner cylinder could rotate freely on an axle, keeping it still while the outer rotates. [+]
shudderprose, Jun 25 2009
  

       finally a use for all those bald used tires you see at the dragstrip [+]
FlyingToaster, Jun 25 2009
  
      
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