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matrixWiki

simple rules, emergent complexity?
 
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Wikis nowadays are too complicated. Instead, we need simple wikis. I propose this alternative:

*Unlimited dimensional character grid wiki

The wiki is an unlimited grid of characters, with an unlimited number of dimensions. You can type into the grid wherever there's unprotected space, and you can protect whatever is available for you to protect. Territory isn't an issue because it's unlimited, and there's always the ubiquitous history function. We can get around the unlimited dimension problem by assuming that if you don't specify your location in a dimension, then you are at that dimension's origin.

A simple test implementation could just have two dimensions: it would just be a massive spreadsheet of cells capable of holding just one character each.

There would be functions for seeing which bits of the wiki were active, birds eye views, etc.

It would be interesting to see how communities organised information in such a space.

Especially if there was a bundled programming system for allowing custom specification of how to drop characters/strings into the matrix (lots of opportunity for obfuscation and art here...), and having arbitrary views onto the matrix.

conskeptical, May 09 2007

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       Yeah, real simple.
jutta, May 09 2007
  

       I guess I mean, simple like Go: 5 minutes to learn, a lifetime to master... :)
conskeptical, May 09 2007
  

       Maybe Conways's life :) With a decent interface I think this could be quite fun and intuitive I think. A bit like a cross between fridge poetry and a wordsearch :)
conskeptical, May 10 2007
  
      
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