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powered trampoline surface

A surface to control energies of rebounding molecules/atoms
 
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For a balloon to have lift the bouyancy equation has to be in it's favour. If we zoom in on the molecular scale of happenings, this equates to the air molecules hitting the balloon molecules and the balloon molecules, which are moving a bit faster impart a lift force for the balloon.

Actin is a molecule in the muscle that, when powered by ATP shortens, muscle fibres. This reaction would be to slow and energy would be hard to supply.But if there was a molecule that oscillates very fast, power by electron current, it could be imbeded in the fabric of the balloon and generate lift.

It would be like this trampoline molecule is pretending to be heated air molecules inside. The more dense the packing and the greater the speed of oscillation the greater the lift.

Plane air flow surfaces could also have the molecules to get away from mechanical flow surfaces.

Prior art is a scaled down basket ball car and an energy realistic Maxwells Demon.

wjt, Aug 10 2016

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       //PTS// Phone Texting Syndrome ?
FlyingToaster, Aug 10 2016
  

       //If we zoom in on the molecular scale of happenings, this equates to the air molecules hitting the balloon molecules and the balloon molecules, which are moving a bit faster impart a lift force for the balloon.//   

       I'm not sure that's right. The balloon molecules have nothing much to do with it (except to provide a balloon). The balloon is effectively a hole in the air (an imperfect hole, unless it's a vacuum balloon with zero wall thickness, but a hole nevertheless.)
MaxwellBuchanan, Aug 10 2016
  

       Balloon molecules, if naturally occurring, must’ve evolved long before balloons themselves. What were they doing all that time?
Ian Tindale, Aug 10 2016
  

       They were there, but not flocking.
FlyingToaster, Aug 10 2016
  

       Since none of the molecules and atoms around or in the balloon are all fixed together, they are working individually. This means the balloons overall action is a encompassing summation of those molecules/atoms. This includes the balloons skin which is forced in position by all the little actions.   

       It's only a hole because of the individual actions (mass included). An action of outside molecule bouncing off the skin will be different on different areas of the balloon and different to just air on the otherside.
wjt, Aug 11 2016
  

       Hmmm, I worked it out for myself that a hot-air balloon rises because the balloon is doing a sneaky balancing act - fewer air molecules inside the balloon, but much more speedy air molecules.   

       Ergo the outside air molecules try to the squash the balloon a bit, to equalise the pressure, but their mojo just doesn't cut it against the very zippy (but fewer) molecules on the inside...   

       Possibly I was even right...
not_morrison_rm, Aug 11 2016
  

       Helium balloons float because the air pressure above the balloon (tending to push it down) is slightly less than the air pressure below the balloon (tending to push it up). The net upward force exceeds the weight of the balloon and its contents.   

       If you fill the balloon with air (and ignore the mass of the balloon itself), the same thing applies. However, now the contents of the balloon have a weight which exactly offsets this lift.
MaxwellBuchanan, Aug 11 2016
  

       If we could see all the interactions of a column of atoms and molecules from solid to 'empty' space, then any motion bump of molecules in the centre of the column would spread down and up the column. In both directions the affect would become infinitesimal.The directions are differentiated. One more dense and one less.   

       Depending on the mass and energy, of the molecule, it would normally equilibrate to a range in the column ( barring stirring energies) Making a collection of helium or hot air is just making a volume that wants to bump a higher equilisation in the column. Any thing higher will bump out of it's way and air below fills in the space and blocks the volume's fall, thus giving the climb.   

       Powered trampoline surface would try to mimic and power up those molecular/atomic bump interactions to benefit the movement of balloon volume.
wjt, Aug 12 2016
  

       Aside: Do helium balloons don't actually have to be all helium ? could you have a fractional lighter balloon? One that floats but doesn't float away.
wjt, Aug 12 2016
  

       //Do helium balloons don't actually have to be all helium ? could you have a fractional lighter balloon? One that floats but doesn't float away//   

       You can fill balloons with any gas mixture, and their floatiness depends only on the overall density of the gas. So, 30% helium 70% nitrogen, for instance, would be only moderately floaty.   

       Getting a balloon to float, but not float away, is trickier but it can be done. If the balloon itself were infinitely thin and stretchy, then it wouldn't work: the balloon will just expand as it rises, and its density will always be less than that of the surrounding air (which is at the same pressure) so it will keep going up.   

       In practice, though, closed balloons are not infinitely stretchy. As they rise into less-dense air, the gas in the balloon cannot expand freely and so its pressure does not drop as much as the surrounding air, so they reach a point where the gas density in the balloon is higher than that of the surrounding air, offsetting the lift.   

       This works very delicately. If you take a helium balloon (especially a non-stretchy mylar one), and gradually add weights, you can get to a point where it will float a few feet off the ground.
MaxwellBuchanan, Aug 12 2016
  

       Taking the extra balloon pressure out the model. An enveloped(non stretchy) volume of air with a portion taken out and replaced by helium can be calculated for neutrality. This would save on helium.
wjt, Aug 14 2016
  

       I thought this was going to be a fun idea about bouncing. :-(
pashute, Aug 15 2016
  

       [pashute] Feel free to write it up.
wjt, Aug 15 2016
  

       Is this just an electrically heated hot-air balloon?
notexactly, Aug 18 2016
  

       hi [bean]
Voice, Aug 20 2016
  

       [notexactly] if the molecular spring is more efficient, more directional then yes.
wjt, Aug 22 2016
  
      
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