Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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shaped flavour

stimulate the Ruffini, Merkel's, Meissner's and filiform receptor's
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If anyone has been shivered by the scraping cutlery against crockery then a social change, where everyone is allowed to lick their plate, would be a welcome addition.

To make this social alteration, I suggest, a texturely engineered plate surface. This could be done with photolithography, Aerosol deposition or even structured crystal growth. Unique patterns and structures could theoretically alter food taste and open a whole new range of gastronomical sensation.

Of course to access this whole new spectrum of flavour variants people would have to lick their plates.

Yay, no more spine chill.

wjt, Sep 23 2016

Feeelings, nothing more than... feelings. http://www.mnn.com/...pes-can-affect-your
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Sep 24 2016]

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       Interesting. Is there any evidence that textures can stimulate the taste receptors?
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 23 2016
  

       //Is there any evidence that textures can stimulate the taste receptors?//   

       Well smell augments taste, but I'm not sure a pure texture can generate a specific nose + tongue 'taste'. As an aside, I added some bright red food colouring to some tandori paste this afternoon to see if that put the final touch to the flavour.   

       It makes you wonder how the current generation are aware of flavour at all with everything bred for yield and tasting like cardboard. For them, the idea makes a bit more sense, but chew texture is probably more important than lick texture.
bigsleep, Sep 23 2016
  

       Which of those receptors responds to angular profiles?
Ian Tindale, Sep 24 2016
  

       [+] suspect bad science, but I like the idea of permanent taste pebbles.   

       //and tasting like cardboard.// Ah but then you can add your choice of sugar, salt, grease and addictive substances.
FlyingToaster, Sep 24 2016
  

       Neat. The shape of what you look at while eating influences taste and so does sound. [link]   

       "This phenomenon has inspired Ben & Jerry's to look into creating a sonic range of ice cream flavors with QR codes on their packaging that allow people to listen to complementary sounds on their phones."   

       Technically speaking, we taste everything by shapes. Or at least, many theories of taste and smell involve receptors that respond to atom groups of certain shapes.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 24 2016
  

       actualy the sintered thing at the interior of electrolytic capicitors, coated with something could stimulate a variety of taste receptors based on the kind of neurology of taste receptor. also laser tweezers as they called, or laser tractor beams (looks like green laser toroids) could reach deep into the tongue to actually vibrate the saliva to heighten taste sensations. I like your idea.
beanangel, Sep 24 2016
  

       //actualy// sp.:, cptliztn: "Actually"
//at// sp.: "in"
//capicitors// sp.: "capacitors"
//neuralogy of taste receptor// meaning: no idea
//also laser tweezers as they called or laser tractor beams (looks like green laser toroids) could reach deep into the tongue to actually vibrate the saliva to heighten taste sensations// Bollocks.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 24 2016
  

       might be capicitors.
Ian Tindale, Sep 24 2016
  

       [beanangel] I do imagine, in the future, energy patterns of various forms will be used to stimulate receptors but I am more interested in static shape.   

       Can we produce a static structure with the scale scope to get abnormal firing? and therefore affect taste.
wjt, Sep 26 2016
  

       //Can we produce a static structure with the scale scope to get abnormal firing? and therefore affect taste.//   

       We can do that. For example, we can create nanostructures based on carbon, oxygen and hydrogen which, if they have the right shape, will trigger the "sweet" receptors. We can also build salt-receptor-triggering structures out of sodium metal, although it's necessary to add a chloride ion to passivate the metal.
MaxwellBuchanan, Sep 26 2016
  

       This type of texture-altering technology could do wonders to enhance intimate encounters.
RayfordSteele, Sep 26 2016
  

       [Max] Wrong scale. Those are molecular field effects. I am thinking the tissue volume, groups of cells scale, to try and change pressures in the mechanical receptors. An attempt to wobble cell walls in dramatic ways type deal.
wjt, Sep 27 2016
  
      
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