Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Superficial Intelligence

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                           

AOL disc recorder

a fun way to recycle CDs
  (+2)
(+2)
  [vote for,
against]

This is what to do with all those AOL discs in your waste basket. A device that looks like a portable CD player but it records on them too. But not the normal way. It cuts grooves in them like a vinyl record. Then you can play DJ, or put them all in a jukebox, or copy all your favorite songs onto them before CD's become obsolete like 8-tracks and everyone has to go buy a DVD-audio player. Groovy records might get scratched sometimes, but in the future everything else will be totally unplayable just like 8-track tapes and beta movies. In 2103, you can still just put the needle on the record and spin!
mr2560, Sep 04 2003

MultiFormat CD http://www.halfbake...ea/MultiFormat_20CD
"You can also have the printed/"top" surface etched like an old-fashioned vinyl record." [phoenix, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 05 2004]

bones from cds machine http://www.halfbake...rom_20cds_20machine
"How about turning them into 45s?" said he. [phoenix, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 05 2004]

(?) Digital Vinyl CDs http://www.verbatim...ucts.cfm?pro_id=379
They're just CDs that *look* like old 45s. [jivetalkinrobot, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 05 2004]

A way to record on CD-R coasters and AOL discs. http://www.geocitie...n/soundscriber.html
Oh, the things you can groove... [Amishman35, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 05 2004]

Somewhat half-baked http://www.halfbake...PC_20Vinyl_20Burner
Similar idea, with some thoughts on how [BunsenHoneydew, Oct 28 2004]

[link]






       How does it work?
Worldgineer, Sep 04 2003
  

       probably just like a real record cutter, making grooves in the plastic. I like it, but I'm concerned about the data density.   

       I agree, CD is anything but permanent storage. (burnable cd anyway. a real "pressed" cd with physical dimples in the recording surface should last for a long time). It's true, you can play an old record with nothing more than a needle and a cup (and maybe a pencil to spin it on), but what's someone going to think ten thousand years from now when presented with a shiny disk full of encoded digital data?
Freefall, Sep 04 2003
  

       [Freefall] : "nice coaster"?
Detly, Sep 04 2003
  

       Can plastic be cut this way like vinyl can? If this would work, you're a genius.
jivetalkinrobot, Sep 05 2003
  

       //Vinyl is plastic//   

       Oh yeah... what I meant was can CD plastic be cut the same way. Even if the density is low, you could still fit at least several minutes on a disc!   

       I've seen blank CDs to buy that *look* like vinyl records [link].
jivetalkinrobot, Sep 05 2003
  

       I have heat up a needle with a match and spun a CD and made a short groove. Then the pin cooled off. I think it might work if I put thin heater wire on the needle and slowly move the tone arm while yelling into a cup that's on the tone arm. This needle I will record with is the kind for stitching. If this works then I will vibrate the needle electromagnetically with output from a radio's amplifier. The only thing I am worried about is if shreds of CD plastic are torn off by the needle and gunk it up, but the right temperature of heat in the needle might prevent that. Finally if all works well then instead of moving the tone arm by hand I will use a clock motor with a screw on it, to move a nut that's on the tone arm, to make nice grooves. If the clock motor records a buzz then I'll try something else.
mr2560, Sep 17 2003
  

       Polycarbonate is pretty hard stuff. A synthetic-diamond-tipped needle would probably be a good idea.
supercat, Sep 17 2003
  

       Good idea. If not heating the needle, which would probably work, maybe you could pre-heat the CD itself. You could definately put a few minutes of music on a CD sized disk. Superb!
KLRico, Dec 01 2003
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle