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Belgian Chocolates

Shouldn't this go under Culture: Language?
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A range of sweets and other good tasting delights with words in foreign languages written on them For example, Belgian Chocolates will have words written on in aa contrasting colour of chocolate in English, Flemish, and French.

Scandinavian salted liquorice would have added tones of liquorice spelling out words in Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, and English.

Now you can educate and energise, all at the same time. Anyone for 'bon-bons'?

[ sctld ], Sep 04 2002

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       Confetion, i accidentally deleted NTG's post. Here it is:   

       *Belgian chocolates are baked. Go to Belgium.   

       How do you propose to put words on chocolates in 3 languages - either they are very big chocolates (yes please) or the writing will be small and indecipherable.   

       And here is my answer:   

       //Belgian chocolates are baked. Go to Belgium.// Welcome to punbakery.   

       A chocolate bar would have a different language on each square of chocolate. There is plenty of room for 'love hearts' style writing on the top, sides, and bottom of chocolates and other sweets alike for words in many languages. Think of those 'lindt' chocolates that have 'lindt' written many times on the bottom of them.
[ sctld ], Sep 04 2002
  

       the words could describe the centres - "strawberry" or "may contain nuts".
po, Sep 04 2002
  

       Welcome home, sctld! You were missed.
yamahito, Sep 04 2002
  

       This is widely baked in many parts of the world. In Egypt, for instance, everything -- but everything -- is signed in both Arabic and English, giving the country the impression of having been taken over by crazed vocabularists. "Ah, look, some nakheel | palm trees."   

       Except in Alexandria, where French is the lingua, ah, franca.
General Washington, Sep 04 2002
  

       <scratches head, quizzically> But Lindt chocolates are Swiss! </s h, q>
beauxeault, Sep 04 2002
  

       Grabs box of chocolate covered cherries. ¯ — _ Runs
thumbwax, Sep 04 2002
  

       trips thumb up and pretends to offer assistance - slips chocolate covered cherries under coat and walks nonchalently away very sl o w l y , b y e b y e
po, Sep 04 2002
  

       at least we *hope* that's why the parade of young boys are trailing behind her, drooling..
yamahito, Sep 04 2002
  

       GW: I don't think the sweets there have random words in other languages actually written on the sweets themselves, not just on the packaging.   

       beauxeault: Does it matter? Other countries make chocolates too.   

       Steve: I came up with this idea while ready a lonely planet guide to Belgium, so the languages taken were those offered in the book, Flemish and French. But any language can be used.   

       bliss: I hope by 'fanny' you mean rear-end.
[ sctld ], Sep 05 2002
  

       Bliss...if only you knew how disgusting that is to non-Americans, heh.
Helium, Sep 05 2002
  

       heh heh bleuuurch
General Washington, Sep 05 2002
  

       Throws pigeon feed at po and drooling schoolboys - observes massive pigeon attack on po - swats one pigeon way, grabs what's left of embedded-on-*oops*skirt chocolate and feather covered cherry, laughs evilly, grabs box containing 11 chocolate-covered-cherries, ¯ — _ Runs, notes Helium is sinisterly eyeing cherries.
thumbwax, Sep 05 2002
  

       .. and, whilst distracted is tripped up once more, this time by yamahito. Chocolate covered cherries go everywhere, and seagulls start to eat them. I laugh, Ha!
yamahito, Sep 05 2002
  

       [bliss] - one part of your anatomy, near your butt, that you have and I don't. (and I don't mean prehensile tail)
PeterSilly, Sep 05 2002
  

       Check on www.m-w.com - the British meaning is shown there as 'slang', but it's not. And don't start on 'fanny packs'...
hippo, Sep 05 2002
  

       Unbeknown to thumbwax, it wasn't his cherries she was eyeing - snigger.
Helium, Sep 05 2002
  

       his 45's or 78's - size is not everything Helium
po, Sep 05 2002
  

       lakrid. yum.
bristolz, Sep 06 2002
  
      
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