Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Chocolate coins worth what they weigh

Eat your assets
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Chocolate coins are WKTE.

These are chocolate coins engineered to withstand rough handling that contain as much actual edible chocolate as their face value.

On the basis that 100g of chocolate costs about USD $1, a dime would be 10g. That's a manageable amount.

Forgery would be impossible because it would always be possible to unwrap the coin and check it contained actual edible chocolate.

In an emergency, you could eat your savings.

8th of 7, Sep 19 2020

US coin specifications https://www.usmint....coin-specifications
[kdf, Sep 19 2020]

Cacao pods as barter currency https://www.nbbmuse...n/2013/03/kakao.htm
[kdf, Sep 19 2020]

[link]






       Global adoption of the Chocolate Standard would put an interesting economic tension between countries which produce chocolate and those whose citizens like to eat a lot of chocolate.
hippo, Sep 19 2020
  

       Wouldn't it just ...   

       <Sniggering/>
8th of 7, Sep 19 2020
  

       I don’t think many people would find a 100g dollar coin or 10g ten cent piece “manageable” either by weight or volume. Compare to current weight/size of current coins (linked). Few people even bother to carry a dollar’s worth of loose change.
kdf, Sep 19 2020
  

       With this scheme, they could start the day with their dollar's worth of coins, and finish it with none.   

       Then the next day, the same thing.   

       Can we interest you in shares in any of BorgCo's subsidiaries ? One makes confectionery, another makes medications to treat obesity and diabetes ... and we're diversifying into making larger-sized garments.   

       Think of it; you make a purchase and get a handful of shrapnel. Well, at the moment, you have to carry it around if you want to retain the value, but this way, you can just eat it.
8th of 7, Sep 19 2020
  

       'Money doesn't grow on trees' is even more not true now! And, since world economies are becoming schizophrenic and/or delusional at an increasing rate, it makes sense to have currency which retains at least one measure of worth as something you can eat*. This solves for repeats of historical instances of 'wheelbarrow full of dollars to buy a loaf of bread'.   

       *Obviously not the only item to eat, at the outset when it still retains a certain trade value.
Sgt Teacup, Sep 19 2020
  

       There’s history behind using cacao as a barter currency - money did grow on trees (link). It’s just coins and this valuation scheme seems ... half baked, or worse.
kdf, Sep 19 2020
  

       // this valuation scheme seems ... half baked //   

       <Points at website URL/>   

       <Reproachful cough/>
8th of 7, Sep 19 2020
  

       Mmm sparemint. The cold countries would have a slight advantage.
wjt, Sep 19 2020
  

       What about the melting problem? Chocolate doesn't retain structural integrity when in close proximity to a human body for too long (I speak from personal experience... chocolated pockets are NOT fun to clean up...).   

       (Edit: it's seems the good [Sgt Teacup] got in ahead of me...)
neutrinos_shadow, Sep 20 2020
  

       Not everyone wants to share in the sordid details of your "personal experience", particularly if "chocolated pockets" is a euphemism for the consequences of some ghastly deviant perverted behaviour, which given the author is highly likely ... [xen], you're a professional in the specialised field of deviant sexual practices, can you confirm ?   

       As for // the good [Sgt Teacup] //, it's only a matter of time before his Evil Twin joins in the conversation ...
8th of 7, Sep 20 2020
  

       Built in inflationary pressures, as chocolate has a limited shelf life. Would be interesting to compare values over time in warm climates vs cold.   

       (spends a chocolate dollar buying a quarter filled croissant)
Worldgineer, Sep 22 2020
  

       // Built in inflationary pressures, as chocolate has a limited shelf life. //   

       No, because if it gets near the marked use-by date, you can always just realize your asset by eating it.
8th of 7, Sep 22 2020
  
      
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