Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
No serviceable parts inside.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


               

Circuitboard Bricks

To give that old world feel to Silicon Valley
  (+1)
(+1)
  [vote for,
against]

Take old used green circuitboards and crush into small pieces. Add clear apoxy to crushed pieces. Mix well. Put mixture into brickmold then let set. Mold has ridges on sides for mortar to adhere to once bricks are finished and ready for use.

End result: Clear brick that has pieces of old circuit boards dispersed throughout and can be seen.

Possible applications for this are building fronts to be used soley to make building look nice and not for structural stability as I do not think these bricks would be able to support large loads. Depending on apoxy used, maybe they could add support to building.

MrDaliLlama, Oct 16 2004

Syndecrete http://www.hgtv.com...537_1373517,00.html
1/2 the weight of concrete, twice the strength, utilizes up to 41% waste stream products including bits of computer circuit boards, chips, brass, etc. [jurist, Oct 16 2004]

Syndesis http://www.syndesisinc.com/
The Company's website with a flash animation intro. Lots of good information about their products and environmental ethic. [jurist, Oct 16 2004]

More pretty Syndecrete photos http://www.syndesisinc.com/crete/mix.html
[jurist, Oct 16 2004]

[link]






       [mrDaliLlama] You might want to investigate David Hertz' company, Syndesis. They're located here in the Santa Monica area (of Los Angeles) and have developed a product called Syndecrete that can be used for tiles, flooring , countertops, vanities, backsplashes and other uses. It is a lightweight concrete product with twice the strength and incorporates waste stream products like crushed circuit boards, glass chips, carpet fiber, etc. The finished product ends up looking like a very hiqh quality terrazzo. Which is not exactly the "brick" you were looking for, but the product is so impressive that I thought you might be interested.   

       I included the first link at the left mainly for the photo of the tiles in which you can clearly make out some of the circuit board bits embedded in the surface of the lower one. The second Syndesis link is far more comprehensive. [Edited later: Third link added with much better photos of products. Click on image to enlarge details of waste products used.] And there's lots on Google about Syndecrete and David Hertz if you want more detail. Hertz is an interesting guy...I've met him.
jurist, Oct 16 2004
  

       David Hertz, I'll bet he's vibrant.
bristolz, Oct 16 2004
  

       He does say "Ouch!" alot, in fact with frequency. And he has 3 kids. I wouldn't be totally surprised to hear that one was named Mega(n).
jurist, Oct 16 2004
  

       Baked in syndecrete I guess, but frankly I have to say most of it looks pretty ugly. Your idea might look better.
5th Earth, Oct 16 2004
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle