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Contest To Create Voices From The Past

Can you create the voice of a person from history as well as Robert Newton when he created "pirate speak"?
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Everybody knows how pirates speak despite there being no recordings of actual pirates speaking, the technology having not existed to create such a thing back then.

The reason we're all fluent in "pirate speak" is due to the incredible creativity and talent of an actor Robert Newton who voiced the world's most famous pirate, Long John Silver in the movie Treasure Island. For one thing they say "Arrrrgh!". Keep in mind, it's doubtful that any pirate, or any human being for that matter has ever said "Arrrgh!". It's a bizarre growl with the totally un-explainable "gh" tacked onto the end. But it's great and NOW it's something that all pirates do.

This is completely random and in retrospect, quite bizarre. The challenge this poses is, can this be repeated?

The idea is to have a contest to create voices for historical figures that are as intriguing and brilliant as the adaptation of Robert Newton's pirate.

The second best classic interpretation of a pre- audio recording historical figure in my opinion is Yul Brynner's pharaoh Ramses in The Ten Commandments. It's just sort of vague but very regal, arrogant and convincing. I'd give him, 4 out of 5 stars, the 5 star standard being set by the brilliant Robert Newton, father of pirate speak.

This would be a Youtube challenge. The figures would be listed and people would wear some article of clothing indicative of the ancient figure they were creating a voice for and read a short script.

How would a Mayan emperor speak? A Babylonian king? We all know that Roman leaders had that lythsp thing going on.

What voice would you create for Pythagoras, Alexander the Great even Kushim, regarded as possibly the earliest known example of a person named in writing?

doctorremulac3, Mar 30 2019

Robert Newton's pirate https://www.youtube...v=FBqtt2E2Vik&t=24s
5 stars. [doctorremulac3, Mar 30 2019]

Yul Brynner's pharaoh https://www.youtube...watch?v=kLZahStHaHU
4 stars. [doctorremulac3, Mar 30 2019]

Mid Atlantic accent https://en.wikipedi...Mid-Atlantic_accent
I've referred to this before. Basically a crazy made up Hollywood accent that's supposed to sound... I don't know, Europeany or something. [doctorremulac3, Mar 30 2019]

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       2 come to mind. (this is not a list, but a suggestion).   

       !. Jesus, perhaps done by Anthony Hopkins   

       2. Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Marlon Brando
blissmiss, Mar 30 2019
  

       I'd trust Anthony Hopkins to do anything he wanted.   

       He actually made a fat old guy scary.
doctorremulac3, Mar 30 2019
  

       I'd pick Frankie Howerd for Jesus, but alas he is no longer with us. Alan Carr for God, obvs.
MaxwellBuchanan, Mar 30 2019
  

       Original Latin, in a New York accent.
FlyingToaster, Mar 30 2019
  

       If so-called “God” is somehow from the past, then what about Sherlock Holmes? Tintin? Rupert Psmith? What about Dr Who, who is a time traveller? Or another time traveller, the time traveller (for H G Wells never actually named him, simply referring to the character as the time traveller, for he time travels).
Ian Tindale, Mar 30 2019
  

       //the 5 star standard being set by the brilliant Robert Newton//   

       Sounds like a west country accent with a bit of scottish. Yul Brynner seems to be just doing a stage voice.   

       Clearly pharaohs spoke with sign language :- boat, wheat, apache helicopter, river, sun, submarine.
bigsleep, Mar 30 2019
  

       Yea, definitely a growling Scotsman at its base, but the "Arrrrgh!" is pure original. (I think) He also over pronunciates which might be an affectation of somebody with a stage acting background trying to emote clearly for a theater full of people.   

       //Yul Brynner seems to be just doing a stage voice.//   

       A variation of the "Mid Atlantic Accent" perhaps?   

       Yea, that's a thing.   

       As far as his Ramses "accent" he's Ukrainian, that's just the way he talks so he probably doesn't deserve any stars now that I think of it. He's got the same accent for The Kind And I which I've never seen, but my sister used to imitate his character when we were kids so I'm more familiar with it than I ever asked to be.
doctorremulac3, Mar 30 2019
  
      
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