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Electronic Check Register: New?

Calculator style check register, very simple
 
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I apologize in advance if this does not qualify as "New", I did read the other idea with the same title, but I will let the readers decide, and you can chastise me if you wish.

My idea was more specific to my own problem, which is failing to record all my debit and internet transactions as well as the 2 or 3 checks max that I write each month. I envision a calculator style check register, the same size and dimensions as a checkbook, with the numbers 0 - 9, plus, minus, enter, and delete commands, which would look almost exactly like a real check register. To keep it simple, the vendor names could be kept on your PC (to avoid the need for an alpha keyboard, saving space) (In the interest of saving cost, I want to keep it low-tech, therefore I am not suggesting the handwriting stylus thingy)(there will be a synch-up software/hardware included) and a "New Vendor" or "Other" option - the more you use it, the less frequently you will need to update your vendor list. I guess you would have to write down or remember the new vendor long enough to get it into your list. Of course this will upload in the form of a .csv format, which I believe Quicken can translate as well as most spreadsheet, database or financial programs. Other formats could be provided but may not be necessary. Perhaps I would need to write special software considering the vendor name issue.

OK, there it is, fire away...

CubicleRat, Oct 13 2003

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       How about just have a small check-sized scanner that doubles as your check book cover. After writing a check, just place it face-down on the check-sized scanner, and scan away, saving its image so you can later upload it at home ... also be able to scan-in deposit, and withdrawl bank statements.
Letsbuildafort, Oct 13 2003
  

       yes, Bliss, and unfortunately, I've had to let my side labrets heal up as part of work ... however, I still have my 8-gauge middle labret ... bringing my grand total up to ONE ... down from 3 ...
Letsbuildafort, Oct 13 2003
  

       Baked in the form of checkbook register programs that run on PDAs. Quite common and handy.
waugsqueke, Oct 13 2003
  

       You could enter check numbers, if not alpha data. You could also assign payee codes which are numeric. Then you could record a written check pretty easily (if you can remember the payee code).
phoenix, Oct 14 2003
  

       Who writes checks anymore?
krelnik, Oct 14 2003
  

       Hmmm... I guess I did not make it very clear, that checks are the least of my problems. I rarely write checks, it's the debit transactions that get away from me. But, as waugsqueke pointed out, if there are already PDA programs that do that, then the only novel thing about my idea is possibly creating a PDA that fits in your checkbook, and does only the check register functions. (Maybe this is still viable, if it can be done much cheaper than PDAs? ) See, my big problem currently is, trying to maintain my checking account balance on my PC or laptop, which cannot be done immediately for each transaction. Therefore, regardless of what nifty program I have such as Quicken on my home PC, the transactions just don't get entered. I have no discipline. My motivation for inventing something like this is both preventing another $280 in overdraft fees, and making a whole sh*tload of money so I don't get into that overdraft trap any more!
CubicleRat, Oct 14 2003
  

       how about a chip built into your atm card, it could have an lcd display to show your balance
xsolox, Jan 24 2004
  
      
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