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FAS Healer

Ultimate first aid suppliment
 
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The First Aid Spray Healer, is a liquid foam that comes in a pressurized spray container (like whip cream). When this foam comes in contact with air, it hardens. This is completely non-toxic and can be removed with another chemical. The purpsose of this spray is to fill in large cuts at any time someone is in danger of bleeding to death. The doctors can then remove the hardened foam when the patient is in a same position to operate on. Oops sorry bout that =) didn't even see that someone else had came up with the same basic idea...scratch
coldshade, Sep 25 2001

Spray on bandage http://www.sixtusus...m/spray_bandage.htm
Only for minor wounds. [pottedstu, Sep 25 2001, last modified Oct 04 2004]

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       Almost baked. You get spray-on bandages, but only to cover minor wounds. Some come off with water, others with "Sixtufit Olympia Sport Fluid", whatever that might be. For major wounds, just spraying on a foam isn't going to stop bleeding. You need to apply a lot of pressure. A foam isn't necessarily going to be waterproof, let alone stand up to pumping arterial blood.
pottedstu, Sep 25 2001
  

       Cauterized wounds don't bleed as much; case in point, Kirk Douglas' wounds in The Vikings. Then you must deal with the inevitable eschar removal, granulation, and infection that result as a consequence of the burn.   

       I don't know why I was thinking this was FOS Healer (like in foods high in FructoOligoSaccharides for nurturing those 'friendly' bacteria). I was about to say, I wouldn't even want healthy dirt in my wound.
reensure, Sep 25 2001
  

       A large cut doesn't need filling - just the two sides stuck together. Superglue does this very well (and has been tested in surgical procedures) - unfortunately as it breaks down in the body toxic substances are produced. Too late for me to find a link to next-gen superglues that are in development.
snagger, Sep 25 2001
  

       formula or its magic.(+)
Voice, Sep 01 2007
  
      
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