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Helium kangaroo suit

Nothing special, just gently jump
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Variation on an existing theme: a helium filled backpack, which you strap on, to go jump around. It won't lift you, because it contains only a few kilos of lift (say 25kgs), just enough to make your body a serious bit lighter to give you the 'moonwalk' feeling.

The underside of the pack is strengthened by a strip of rubber, so that your tail can touch the ground without the pack getting damaged.

Mainly designed because I like the form of the object (see pic). Nothing special, just yellow and kangaroo-ish.

django, Sep 06 2006

Quickie, the form is pleasant I think http://i3.photobuck...esel/heliumjump.jpg
Been designing so many things with this form, cell-phone, cocktail shakers, macaroni, etc... the line isn't perfect here, but you see where it's going [django, Sep 06 2006]

Parabounce http://www.parabounce.com/
Using a 20 foot diameter helium balloon, simply push off from the ground and leap 100 feet into the air and travel up to a quarter-mile before gently ... [baconbrain, Sep 06 2006]

Holy smurf! http://www.davelgil.com/korea/smurf.jpg
That's it!! [django, Sep 06 2006]

[link]






       Lookie! Giant flying bananas!   

       *ook*
DesertFox, Sep 06 2006
  

       Not be used indoors, I presume. Or do I presume too much?
NotTheSharpestSpoon, Sep 06 2006
  

       A backpack? To get this much lift would require about 900 cubic feet of helium.
ldischler, Sep 06 2006
  

       /A backpack? To get this much lift would require about 900 cubic feet of helium./   

       Well, let's divide the volume up into spheres: in the middle a sphere with a radius of 2 metres (=33.5 cubic metres), on top and under it, one with a radius of 1.5 metres (=two times 14 cubic metres: 28m³); and two small spheres of 0.5 metres radius at the extremities (=two times 0.5m³ = 1m³). In total we would have around 62.5 cubic metres.   

       One cubic meter of helium gives around 1 kilogram of lift, so you would have 62.5 kilos of lift. The total surface area would be somewhere around 90 square metres. Now take a strong hypalon fabric weighing 0.3 kilo per m² and your fabric weighs 30 kilos. 62.5 kilos of lift, minus 30 kilos of fabric = 32.5 kilos of net lift!   

       That should give you anti-gravity feelings. And all your worries about having a heavy bvtt would be gone instantly!
django, Sep 06 2006
  

       I already have anti-gravity feelings - horrible heavy stuff that it is.
wagster, Sep 06 2006
  

       Don't let go of product or hand it to small children. (+)
GutPunchLullabies, Sep 06 2006
  

       Love the illustration and the idea.   

       This sounded like something the Clusterballoon guy might have done, though not so prettily. He had a link to Parabounce, which crashes my computer. I googled, and got a lot of hits, but haven't looked at any.   

       The tail could act as a spring.
baconbrain, Sep 06 2006
  

       Smurfs! That's it, now I remember where I've seen that form before. I grew up with Les Schtroumpfs, that's it!! Has been lingering deep in the depth of my genius mind for decades!
django, Sep 06 2006
  

       Not to be used in high... or any... winds. I could see a bunch of people jumping around like nutters in a tall warehouse with a padded floor. [+]
st3f, Sep 07 2006
  

       //in a tall warehouse with a padded floor. //   

       A padded ceiling would be more useful I think.
webfishrune, Sep 07 2006
  

       That, too.
st3f, Sep 08 2006
  

       Nice.
doctorremulac3, Mar 19 2011
  
      
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