Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Triangle trade monument

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It just seems odd to me that there is no monument for the triangle trade.

I refer to the work of Joshua Springer, mathematical, philosophical, optical & musical instrument maker, of No: 2, Clare Street, Bristol.

Single-handedly he started the triangle trade when, due to a cancelled domestic order, he was left with 7,368 triangles and exported them to the colo..the USA in exchange for tobacco which which then shipped back and sold at a profit.

His main market was an obscure schismatic group of Fresian emigres, whose religion code forbade playing musical instruments, but there was bugger all else to do on the farm at nights, so this was a pragmatic decision on behalf of the elders.

not_morrison_rm, Mar 09 2013

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       Joshua Springer may have been responsible for starting the triangle trade, but it was Northrop Andrew Britten who made the all-important addition of the central hole.   

       It was this feature which simultaneously made the triangle light, sonorous, and capable of being played really fast by just wanging the stick round in the middle.   

       Some credit must also go to Jervick Kymhurge, who conceived of hanging the thing from a string.
MaxwellBuchanan, Mar 09 2013
  

       It's said that the lack of welding technologies at that time in America led to the simplified imitation model with one of the angles open. It was an acceptable cheap solution, but far away from the superior sound and quality of an original Springer triangle.
piluso, Mar 09 2013
  

       And yet considerably better than the French version, in which all three angles were open.
MaxwellBuchanan, Mar 09 2013
  

       Yes but credit to the French, they were the first to join up any of the angles!
pocmloc, Mar 10 2013
  
      
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