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Triple Blind Trial

New drug testing regime
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Many would be familiar with the double blind trial where a selected group of patients with a disease are given either a new drug or a placebo to determine the effect of the drug (the double blind bit comes from neither the patient or the trial Dr. knowing who has the drug or the placebo).

I am suggesting that this is expanded further given the number of drugs that are sold for their secondary effects (ie. Viagra was initially tested as a heart drug, an unusual side effect was noted!).

Given this a triple blind trial would involve the drug being tested on a range of diseases to determine its effectiveness compared with the placebo.

PiledHigherandDeeper, Jun 04 2003

[link]






       How do you like my teats?
thumbwax, Jun 04 2003
  

       how feasible is this?
Infinitely buzzing, Jun 04 2003
  

       What sort of disease are we talking about here? I'm not sure doctors would be willing to toy with people's lives, although these pellets they keep giving me are excellent.
1234L5tuff, Jun 04 2003
  

       while I agree with your sentiment, the resources which are necessary to monitor all of the different parameters/affects/effects are not fully in place for double blind tests and would be lacking even further in your proposal. Raw data does no good if no one can understand it or even record it.
ato_de, Jun 04 2003
  

       If you're trying to discover unknown secondary benefits of existing drugs, you're much better off simply tracking a broad section of the population against all their medications and medical indications. Which is, to a greater or lesser extent, being done.
DrCurry, Jun 04 2003
  

       A better idea would be the septuple blind study:
patient does not know if they are taking drug or placebo
doctor does not know is he is giving drug or placebo
neither doctor nor patient knows what disease patient has
patient does not know if he is in the study or not
doctor never actually went to medical school
doctor and patient accidentally meet at a flea market and haggle over rare collectable beer cans.
bungston, Jun 04 2003
  

       patient doesn't know s/he's actually her/is own doctor   

       doctor sells him/erself a beer can that is neither rare nor collectable.
Worldgineer, Jun 04 2003
  

       Sounds like a Phillip K. Dick novel.
snarfyguy, Jun 04 2003
  

       Actually, one of the best ways of tracking the effects of a drug (intended and unintended) is a DNA microarray. You test the drug with various cultured tissues, then use the microarray to determine which genes are expressed (as compared to untreated tissue).   

       I'd find a link, but I was making a poster for my drug design project until 3 this morning.
mandy, Jun 04 2003
  

       I was just thinking of a triple blind trial involving the drug, some chalk and a low grade opiate.   

       But I guess the problem is that the double or triple part of any study is dropped in favour of media coverage.   

       "50% of all participants said they felt much better".
bigsleep, Sep 25 2016
  

       "Ask your physician if Placebo is right for you ...."   

       // neither doctor nor patient knows what disease patient has //   

       That's been Standard Operating Procedure in the NHS for decades ...   

       Besides, the doctor can always find what disease the patient had by referring to the autopsy report.
8th of 7, Sep 25 2016
  

       N-ple blind trial: all drugs and candy products are exchanged and assigned a random label by machine. To assure anonymity no patients are tracked or studied. Efficacy is shown by whether society collapses or improves.
Worldgineer, Sep 26 2016
  
      
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