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Your optimal city and state

Software tells you where to move for opportunity and satisfaction based on actual data and measured personality.
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“Your optimal city and state” AI or software does a better than human job of suggesting where to move for opportunity, happiness and satisfaction. The AI has some similarity to a financial roboadvisor. Along with asking you what you would like it administers a well validated psychology test like the big 5 (or some new, better test).

As regular software it is quite possible to just code it. As an AI (like deep learning) the self-reported well being of people with scores at the big 5 scales would be the weights that suggest greater well being for various personalities at different cities. At the hardcoded version Madison WI might numerically edge out Flagstaff, AZ, but for people high on big 5 extroversion perhaps Flagstaff has a stronger measured satisfaction. The AI version could do a better job with enough data.

Also, the AI "kerned" version generates a longer list of desirable cities or other areas rather than just being similar to a top 10 list that might cause lopsided city growth.

Improving things further:

Then this autolists the person’s availability with job recruiters in that area: You can get three or more interviews before moving, this generates peace of mind and uninterrupted income.

The software sends you a nice email that says, "you can move to Flagstaff, earn $40,000 more a year <clickable links to recruiter offers> and enjoy life more fully there than at any other city in the US. Our international version however recommends Gothenberg Sweden."

beanangel, Jan 23 2019

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       Anecdotally, I've heard the answer for most people ought to be "Portland".
zen_tom, Jan 23 2019
  

       So evolution to grey goo via A.I. categories? "Amused To Death", Rodger Waters comes to my mind.
wjt, Jan 23 2019
  

       Paragraph breaks, proper grammar and spelling, and a coherently phrased actual idea for a thing that can be made without magic. Are you feeling okay?
Voice, Jan 23 2019
  

       Problem is that people seem to flock to where it's currently booming which is all there would be for AI to go by. The trick is to figure out where it is going to be booming next... and to get in before that happens.   

       I can see the cycles for this and have based my family's decisions for the last 20 years or so around this ability.
So far so good. <knocks on wood>
  

       Will AI also see these trends be able to predict booms and busts or will all information given be based on current city status alone?   

       This sounds like an index-tracker fund except, as well as contributing to asset-price bubbles, it would contribute to entire- life bubbles, with spectacular dystopian "corrections".
pertinax, Jan 24 2019
  

       Surely the optimum state is happiness, no matter what, in almost all circumstances? Why would anyone prefer a state such as confusion, depression or fear?
Ian Tindale, Jan 24 2019
  

       The happiest young people in the world live in Amsterdam and the happiest general population live in Copenhagen. Compared to these, and several other European cities like Vienna, Lisbon, Rotterdam and others, American cities would be emptied of their citizens if moving there was a real option.....this process is already underway in the UK as hundreds of businesses flood out to EU capitals before the brexit disaster of an isolated UK destroys them.
xenzag, Jan 24 2019
  

       If everyone uses this services and acts on the results, then they'll move to cities where everyone is just like themselves, which could be ghastly.
hippo, Jan 24 2019
  
      
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